Automatic backups with standard UNIX-tools

A good backup routine makes you sleep good. I have been playing around for years looking for the perfect backup tools for my server and ended up close to where I started — with a couple of standard UNIX-tools.

So, I wanted a daily backup routine that archived selected content and saved it on a remote host, not incremental but by date. The tools I use to accomplish that is SSH, cron, tar. Yes, you have them already on your server so lets get started. If you do not have a RSA key, open a terminal, and type the following:

ssh-keygen -t rsa

Make sure that you leave passphrase empty, as follows:

Generating public/private rsa key pair.
Enter file in which to save the key (/home/matias/.ssh/id_rsa):
Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase): 
Enter same passphrase again: 
Your identification has been saved in /home/matias/.ssh/id_rsa.
Your public key has been saved in /home/matias/.ssh/id_rsa.pub.

Now, store the public key (id_rsa.pub) on your target server, change the following command to fit your needs (user/host):

cat $HOME/.ssh/id_rsa.pub | ssh user@host "cat >> .ssh/authorized_keys"

Now you need a simple bash scripts that will archive content. Since my content is already compressed, I use tar to pack the source files with hostname and date, as follows:

#!/bin/bash
DATE="`date +"%Y-%m-%d"`"
SOURCE="/path"
TARGET="/path/$HOSTNAME-$DATE.tar"
tar -cvf - $SOURCE | ssh user@host "cat > $TARGET"

Name the file for example backup.sh and continue. Now, put this into your cron and choose when you want the script to run (below is nightly at 04:30).

30 4 * * * bash /home/matias/backup.sh > /dev/null 2>&1

The reason I pipe the tar file to SSH is that I do not want to store the file temporary since it could be big. Second is that I do not want to use SCP since the speed is notable slower. Enjoy!

 

Easy install NGINX, HHVM and MySQL on Debian 8.1 server

Do you want to install NGINX, HHVM and MySQL on a Debian server? Well, I have a script which do this and is easy to run. Simply copy the code below into a file (install.sh) and run it from your terminal.

#!/bin/bash

sudo apt-key adv --recv-keys --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 0x5a16e7281be7a449
echo deb http://dl.hhvm.com/debian jessie main | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/hhvm.list
sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install nginx mysql-server mysql-client hhvm
sudo update-rc.d hhvm defaults
sudo /usr/share/hhvm/install_fastcgi.sh

sudo cat > /etc/nginx/sites-available/default << EOL
server {
 listen 80;
 root /usr/share/nginx/html;
 index index.html index.htm index.php;

 server_name localhost;
 include hhvm.conf;

 location / {
 try_files $uri $uri/ /index.php?$args;
 }
}
EOL
sudo /etc/init.d/nginx restart

Install rednotebook diary and journal software on Ubuntu Debian Fedora

Apr 09, 2013, 14:00 (0 Talkback[s])


(Other stories by Ryan Harris)

RedNoteBook is a open source diary and journal software for Linux, Windows and Mac. It includes a calendar navigation, customizable templates, export functionality and word clouds. You can also format, tag and search your entries. RedNotebook is Free Software under the GPL.

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Article source: http://www.linuxtoday.com/upload/install-rednotebook-diary-and-journal-software-on-ubuntu-debian-fedora-130408201509.html

Debian gets served by Bytemark

Apr 08, 2013, 06:00 (0 Talkback[s])

The Debian Project has announced that Bytemark Hosting has donated a fully populated 16 server blade HP BladeSystem with HP Modular Storage Arrays containing 57TB of storage. The new server, which will make its home at Bytemark’s new data centre in York, is said to be worth £150,000 per annum in commercial terms.

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Article source: http://www.linuxtoday.com/infrastructure/debian-gets-served-by-bytemark.html

Security Advisory SA52865 – Debian update for postgresql

Description

Debian has issued an update for postgresql. This fixes a weakness, which can be exploited by malicious users to conduct brute force attacks.

For more information see vulnerability #2 in:
SA52837

Solution
Apply updated packages via the apt-get package manager.
Original Advisory
DSA-2657-1:
http://www.debian.org/security/2013/dsa-2657

Other references
Further
details available to Secunia VIM customers

Deep Links
Links
available to Secunia VIM customers

Do you have additional information related to this advisory?

Please provide information about patches, mitigating factors, new
versions, exploits, faulty patches, links, and other relevant data by
posting comments to this Advisory. You can also send this information to
vuln@secunia.com

No posts yet

Article source: http://www.secunia.com/advisories/52865

How to Install Asterisk 11 in RHEL/CentOS/Fedora and Ubuntu/ Debian /Linux Mint

Apr 02, 2013, 23:00 (0 Talkback[s])


(Other stories by Ravi Saive)

Asterisk is an Open Source software PBX (Private Branch Exchange), developed by Mark Specer of Digium. It allows you to make calls to one another which may have connected to other PSTN (Public Switched Telephone Network) and Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP). Asterisk runs on Linux, BSD, MacOSX and others. Having built-in features like voicemail, conferencing, IVR, queuing etc.

In this article, we are going to see a basic installation and working of Asterisk 11 in RHEL 6.4/6.3/6.2/6.1/6.0, CentOS 6.4/6.3/6.2/6.1/6.0, Fedora 18,17,16, Ubuntu 12.10/12.04/11.10, Linux Mint 14/13 and Debian Linux Operating Systems.

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Article source: http://www.linuxtoday.com/upload/how-to-install-asterisk-11-in-rhelcentosfedora-and-ubuntudebianlinux-mint-130402024005.html

Software destined for ValveÂ’s Steam Box appears on SteamPowered.com

Valve’s PC-for-your-living-room Steam Box may be moving closer to release, as evidenced by the appearance of new software packages on the SteamPowered.com Web server. Ever since the news first broke of Valve’s intent to release its own console, the company has clearly stated that the box would run some flavor of Linux; the nature of these new packages strongly points to a Debian-style Linux distro like Ubuntu.

Linux enthusiast site Phoronix is carrying the news of the packages’ emergence, noting that the contents of the new hometest repository differ significantly from the previous steam repo. The older public repo merely contains packages to install Steam and its launcher on Debian-based Linux distributions, but the new hometest repo has far richer contents. According to Phoronix, the repo holds “experimental NVIDIA Linux graphics drivers, a Plymouth boot splash screen for Steam, and Valve wallpapers,” along with a simple “autoupdate” package to keep the system up to date. It also contains the same Steam Linux binaries already available in the older repo.

Phoronix speculates that the Steam Box, when it eventually appears, will be based on an LTS Ubuntu release, though it’s too early to rule out potential plans for a “Steam Linux” distro. It wouldn’t take a tremendous amount of work for Valve to repackage Ubuntu in such a way—Linux Mint is already just such a repackaging, relying on Canonical for most of its packages while substituting in several alternatives (and different default GUIs).

Valve’s willingness to keep its additions transparent and available also means you might not necessarily need to go buy a Steam Box (whatever form it ends up taking) to get the authentic Steam experience in your living room—as long as Valve continues to keep things open, any Debian-ish Linux box that meets the minimum hardware requirements will do.

Article source: http://arstechnica.com/gaming/2013/04/software-destined-for-valves-steam-box-appears-on-steampowered-com/

Ubuntu slashes support, Debian 7.0 draws near

It wasn’t all that long ago that Canonical extended the support period for Long Term Support (LTS) releases of its Ubuntu Linux from three years to five, but last week it made a move in the opposite direction for its non-LTS software.

Specifically, beginning with Ubuntu 13.04 “Raring Ringtail,” which is due in April, Canonical will reduce the support period for interim versions of its popular Linux distribution  from 18 months to just nine.

[ Prove your expertise with the free OS in InfoWorld’s Linux admin IQ test round 1 and round 2. | Track the latest trends in open source with InfoWorld’s Open Sources blog and Technology: Open Source newsletter. ]

New Ubuntu releases come out every six months, with LTS versions every two years.

Prepare for a wider role
Spurring consideration of the question was a proposal from Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth earlier this month, suggesting several changes to Ubuntu release management as a way to “go even faster as the leading free software platform, meet the needs of both our external users and internal communities (Unity, Canonical, Kubuntu, Xubuntu and many many others) and prepare for a wider role in personal computing.”

Among Shuttleworth’s proposals were a strengthening of LTS point releases and a reduction in the amount of release management — including the duration of support — for interim releases of the free and open source operating system.

“Our working assumption is that the latest interim release is used by folks who will be involved, even if tangentially, in the making of Ubuntu, and LTS releases will be used by those who purely consume it,” Shuttleworth explained.

In a subsequent meeting of the Ubuntu Technical Board last Monday, members voted  on a nine-month duration for non-LTS support rather than the seven Shuttleworth had proposed.

As Shuttleworth suggested, this change will likely have a bigger effect on cutting-edge power users than on business users, who tend to stick with LTS releases anyway.

Just 57 bugs remain
Meanwhile, in other distro news, it looks like Debian 7.0 “Wheezy,” which has long been eagerly awaited by fans of the venerable Linux distribution, will be ready for release soon.

“The Wheezy release is getting ever closer,” wrote developer Julien Cristau in an update last Wednesday, at which time the bug count was down to 100.

As of today, just 57 bugs remain, so it seems safe to say a release will happen sometime in the near future. The current stable version, Debian 6.0 “Squeeze,” was released back in February 2011.

Article source: http://www.infoworld.com/d/open-source-software/ubuntu-slashes-support-debian-70-draws-near-215204

Linux Top 3: Ubuntu Kaylin, Debian Wheezy and Linux Mint

1) Ubuntu Heads to China

In recent years, there has been no shortage of new Ubuntu derivatives to cater to different needs. Those have including different desktop editions (Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu) and needs (ie. Ubuntu Studio Edition).

Now Canonical, the lead sponsor behind Ubuntu is building a new version of Ubuntu specifically for China. The new version is call Kylin and is being developed in partnership with government agencies in China.

Kylin will have Chinese language input and localization and will also have a Chinese calendar.

The first version of Kylin will coincide with the Ubuntu 13.04 release set to debut in April. Moving beyond the initial release, Canonical plans on providing further specific Chinese integrations including the use of Baidu maps and Taobao shopping.

“The release of Ubuntu Kylin brings the Chinese open source community into the global Ubuntu community,” said Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu and Canonical in a statement. “With Ubuntu Kylin, China now has its own secure and stable desktop operating system, produced alongside Ubuntu’s global community. Ubuntu combines proven technology with a mature ecosystem and strong OEM and ISV partners, and this initiative allows the Joint Lab to bring those strengths to China across the full range of platforms: desktop, server, cloud, tablet and phone.”

2) LMDE 201303

While Ubuntu pushes forward, so too does the upstart Linux Mint distro. The main Linux Mint distro is based on Ubuntu, but there is also a pure-bred Debian release version as well.

The Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) version 2013-03 was released last week, providing a Debian base to Mint. According to Linux Mint founder, Clem Lefebre, the purpose of LMDE is to look identical to the main edition and to provide the same functionality while using Debian as a base.”

The LMDE is also faster than the base Ubuntu version, though it lacks some of the ease-of-use features of Ubuntu and it does not have SecureBoot support either.

LMDE is a semi-rolling distribution which is a bit different than a typical milestone release based approach.

“Updates are constantly fed to Debian Testing, where users experience frequent regressions but also frequent bug fixes and improvements. LMDE receives “Update Packs” which are tested snapshots of Debian Testing. Users can experience a more stable system thanks to update packs, or switch their sources to follow Testing, or even Unstable, directly to get more frequent updates.”

3) Debian Wheezy

Speaking of Debian, the next major release is rapidly nearing release. The Wheezy release now has less than 100 bugs remaining to be patched.

While Debian has always been a Linux distro that is – Done when it’s done – the release engineering folks are locking down to make sure that it’s done, sooner rather than later.

In a mailing list posting, Debian developer Julien Cristau wrote:

“As the release approaches, it’s more likely that we will simply remove packages that have open RC bugs.”

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network,  the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.




Solid State Drives: The Future of Data Storage?

icon
Solid state disks (SSDs) made a splash in consumer technology, and now the technology has its eyes on the enterprise storage market. Download this eBook to see what SSDs can do for your infrastructure and review the pros and cons of this potentially game-changing storage technology.

Article source: http://www.linuxplanet.com/news/linux-top-3-ubuntu-kaylin-debian-wheezy-and-linux-mint.html

Linux distro update: Ubuntu slashes support, Debian 7.0 draws near

It wasn’t all that long ago that Canonical extended the support period for Long Term Support (LTS) releases of its Ubuntu Linux from three years to five, but last week it made a move in the opposite direction for its non-LTS software.

Specifically, beginning with Ubuntu 13.04 “Raring Ringtail,” which is due in April, Canonical will reduce the support period for interim versions of its popular Linux distribution  from 18 months to just nine.

New Ubuntu releases come out every six months, with LTS versions every two years.

‘Prepare for a wider role’

Spurring consideration of the question was a proposal from Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth earlier this month, suggesting several changes to Ubuntu release management as a way to “go even faster as the leading free software platform, meet the needs of both our external users and internal communities (Unity, Canonical, Kubuntu, Xubuntu and many many others) and prepare for a wider role in personal computing.”

Among Shuttleworth’s proposals were a strengthening of LTS point releases and a reduction in the amount of release management—including the duration of support—for interim releases of the free and open source operating system.

“Our working assumption is that the latest interim release is used by folks who will be involved, even if tangentially, in the making of Ubuntu, and LTS releases will be used by those who purely consume it,” Shuttleworth explained.

In a subsequent meeting of the Ubuntu Technical Board last Monday, members voted  on a nine-month duration for non-LTS support rather than the seven Shuttleworth had proposed.

As Shuttleworth suggested, this change will likely have a bigger effect on cutting-edge power users than on business users, who tend to stick with LTS releases anyway.

Just 57 bugs remain

Meanwhile, in other distro news, it looks like Debian 7.0 “Wheezy,” which has long been eagerly awaited by fans of the venerable Linux distribution, will be ready for release soon.

“The Wheezy release is getting ever closer,” wrote developer Julien Cristau in an update last Wednesday, at which time the bug count was down to 100.

As of today, just 57 bugs remain, so it seems safe to say a release will happen sometime in the near future. The current stable version, Debian 6.0 “Squeeze,” was released back in February 2011.

Top image credit: Adriano Gasparri on Flickr

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2031955/linux-distro-update-ubuntu-slashes-support-debian-7-0-draws-near.html

A look at Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) 201303

Mar 25, 2013, 11:00 (0 Talkback[s])

Specifically, it’s built on the Testing Branch of Debian — currently the ‘Wheezy’ release (although probably not for much longer). There are pros and cons to this – if you don’t like Ubuntu, or you really prefer to start from a cleaner, more basic distribution, then being based on Debian is a big plus.

On the down side, it means that it contains a lot of things which are well behind the latest current releases, starting from the Linux kernel itself — 3.2.0 rather than the 3.7.x or 3.8.x that other recent distributions feature — and the X Window System, 1.12.4 compared to 1.13.x, and so on.

What this means is that you need to pay a bit more attention if you’re going to try LMDE, make sure your hardware is compatible and supported, and be prepared to put in a bit more effort in getting everything installed, configured and running. The fact is that pretty much describes a typical Debian user anyway, so I don’t see it as a big problem.

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Article source: http://www.linuxtoday.com/it_management/a-look-at-linux-mint-debian-edition-lmde-201303.html

Pi MusicBox weds Spotify and Raspberry Pi, plays your favorite tunes

Pi MusicBox weds Spotify and Raspberry Pi

Do you listen to Spotify? Do you have a Raspberry Pi? Well, Pi MusicBox might just be the thing for you. It’s a bootable Debian image for RaspBerry Pi that implements Modipy, a music server which enables playback from local storage, Spotify streaming and remote-control from any MPD (Music Player Daemon) client or web browser (see screenshots above). There are MPD apps for most platforms, including Android, iOS, Windows and Mac OS. Pi MusicBox also supports WiFi, USB audio and AirTunes streaming right out of the, err, box. So, if your Raspberry Pi is jonesing to play some tunes, go ahead and hit those links below.

Article source: http://www.engadget.com/2013/03/25/pi-musicbox-weds-spotify-and-raspberry-pi-plays-your-favorite-t/

Debian Wheezy Linux Nearing the Finish Line as 100 Bugs Remain

From the ‘It’s Done, When It’s Done’ files:

Watching Debian Linux releases come together has always been a long and drawn out process. Few other Linux projects (if any) have the same breadth of platform support or packages and few (if any) have the same fiercely principled approach (hurray Debian Free Software Guidelines) to development either.

The next big Debian release – codenamed Wheezy – (all Debian releases in recent memory have been named after Toy Story characters) is nearing the finish line.

First, there are 100 bugs that need to be fixed.

So how is Debian going to deal with those last 100 bugs?

It’s a process that will involve discipline and some package cutting too.

In a mailing list posting, Debian developer Julien Cristau wrote:

“We are only interested in the absolute minimum patches that fix RC bugs. Spurious changes will simply lead to longer review times for everyone, disappointment and ultimately a longer freeze.

It helps us if you justify your request sufficiently to save time going back and forth. We don’t know all packages intimately, so we rely on you to answer the question “why should this fix be accepted at this stage?”

Going a step further – Cristau added:

“As the release approaches, it’s more likely that we will simply remove packages that have open RC bugs.”

Debian has long had the philosophy of being done, when it’s done. It’s a philosophy that has caused trouble in the past (ie. the Sarge release which was delayed for nearly a year back in 2005. It’s also a philosophy that works (assuming you can herd cats).

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network,  the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Article source: http://www.internetnews.com/blog/skerner/debian-wheezy-linux-nearing-the-finish-line-as-100-bugs-remain.html

SparkyLinux 2.1 Has Been Officially Released

Mar 19, 2013, 15:00 (0 Talkback[s])


(Other stories by Marius Nestor)

Dubbed Eris, SparkyLinux 2.1 is now powered by Linux kernel 3.2.39-2 and it is based on the Debian testing repos as of March 15, 2013. SparkyLinux 2.1 also comes with a new set of wallpapers, a working Live system, which is now compatible with USB flash drivers, support for installing the distro from a USB stick, as well as minor bug fixes.

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Article source: http://www.linuxtoday.com/upload/sparkylinux-2.1-has-been-officially-released-130319051531.html

SparkyLinux 2.1 Has Been Officially Released

Mar 19, 2013, 15:00 (0 Talkback[s])


(Other stories by Marius Nestor)

Dubbed Eris, SparkyLinux 2.1 is now powered by Linux kernel 3.2.39-2 and it is based on the Debian testing repos as of March 15, 2013. SparkyLinux 2.1 also comes with a new set of wallpapers, a working Live system, which is now compatible with USB flash drivers, support for installing the distro from a USB stick, as well as minor bug fixes.

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Article source: http://www.linuxtoday.com/upload/sparkylinux-2.1-has-been-officially-released-130319051531.html

Kanotix 2013 CeBIT Surprise

Mar 11, 2013, 14:00 (0 Talkback[s])


(Other stories by Anonymous)

Kanotix is a Debian-based desktop distribution originally designed to support a wider selection of hardware and provider newer packages than Debian. Started in 2003, Kanotix has had a rocky history with at least two declared deaths and rebirths. Now today a new release was announced with Steam installed by default. Kanotix 2013 ships with Linux 3.8.2, Xorg X Server 1.12.4, GCC 4.7.2, Grub 2, KDE 4.8.4, and NVIDIA 313.18. Some of the applications include LibreOffice 4.0, Amarok 2.7.0, VLC 2.0.3, GIMP 2.8.2, and Iceweasel 19.

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Article source: http://www.linuxtoday.com/upload/kanotix-2013-cebit-surprise-130311014507.html

Building PHP 5.4 From Source On Debian Squeeze

Mar 09, 2013, 15:00 (0 Talkback[s])


(Other stories by Michel K??ser)

This tutorial describes how you can build PHP 5.4 from source on Debian Squeeze. Later on, we will install more modules through PECL and add it as an additional PHP version to ISPConfig’s dropdown. At the end you will have a fully function PHP 5.4 installation which is selectable within the ISPConfig interface and a .deb package than can be used on other server as well.

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Article source: http://www.linuxtoday.com/upload/building-php-5.4-from-source-on-debian-squeeze-130308002009.html