A tour of Ubuntu 11.10, Oneiric Ocelot

Ubuntu login screen

Canonical has released the latest build of its free, open-source OS, version 11.10. Alliteratively titled as “Oneiric Ocelot”, the OS has taken the major changes that were made in 11.04 and smooths out the rough edges and sharp corners that users have been griping about, as well as adding the Thunderbird email client to the lineup. Ocelot is not perfect, but it is apparent that the Ubuntu devs are working hard to make desktop Linux something that is appealing to the mass consumer market. Indeed, when one sees the visual improvements to the graphical elements, they smack of elements that would come out of Cupertino.

While this eye candy certainly is a people pleaser, the more hardcore Linux user is going to find flaws in the underpinnings of the OS, especially if they have an issue with using the Unity-skinned GNOME.  The topic of GNOME vs. KDE is not something to dive into with this article, but it is germane in the fact that more advanced users (including its creator, Linus) are complaining that the use of GNOME makes it harder to accomplish tasks.

While some may call the continued use of GNOME a dumbing down of a powerful system, the visual aspect along with ease of use goes right along with the statement that Ubuntu wants to hit 200 million users to remain competitive.  The only way they are going to do that is to appeal to a normal, everyday end user who wants to check email, listen to music, and shop for apps with a click of their mouse. In that sense, Ocelot is right on the mark. The end result of this build is an “it just works” presentation to the end user, making it more friendly to a person who has used Windows or OS X their entire computing lives.

The screenshots in the following pages outline the major changes to the OS, make sure to check them out. Also, if you want a walk through of Ocelot before installing, you can use the super-slick online tour that Canonical has put together.

Article source: http://www.extremetech.com/computing/99799-a-tour-of-ubuntu-11-10-oneiric-ocelot

Ubuntu 11.10 Released

They already did. Linux never gave up on alternative architectures, with many distros still supporting long dead architectures like MIPS, as well as adding support for newer ones like ARM.

Ubuntu is one of the only mainstream distros that only supports x86. The other big boys (Fedora, Debian, ArchLinux and some derivatives of those) all support more architectures than Windows ever did and ever will.

As for the kernel itself: it was the basis for both WebOS and Android. ’nuff said me thinks.

Article source: http://www.anandtech.com/show/4963/ubuntu-1110-released

Ubuntu One for Windows

If you’ve been checking the Ubuntu home page for news of Ubuntu 11.10 (Oneiric Ocelot), which is released today, you will until recently have been confronted by a page promoting Ubuntu One for Windows — although the actual release was a couple of weeks ago at the end of September.

Ubuntu One is a synchronisation app for the eponymous cloud storage service that’s provided by default with the Ubuntu OS. Under the Gnome desktop it appears under System/Preferences, while with Unity it has an icon in the launcher. Once you’ve set up an account you get 5GB of cloud storage for free (expansion to 20GB costs $3.99 a month), where you can share and synchronise files, photos, videos and music across multiple internet-connected devices.

The Windows client offers the same functionality to Windows users, and once signed up all you have to do is choose a folder on your system to synchronise that contains less than the initial 5GB limit. A control dashboard has tabs for Folders, Devices, Settings and Account information.

The Ubuntu music streaming service is available for $3.99 a month subscription which includes 20GB of additional storage. Ubuntu 1 files and Ubuntu 1 music are available for Android and Ubuntu 1 music only for the iPhone.

Of course, Ubuntu One is not the only cloud storage service — competitors include Dropbox, SugarSync and Windows Live SkyDrive, for example. But making Ubuntu One cross-platform should help strengthen the Ubuntu brand.

Terry Relph-Knight

Article source: http://www.zdnet.co.uk/blogs/zdnet-uk-first-take-10013312/ubuntu-one-for-windows-10024559/

Ubuntu unveils Oneiric Ocelot update

ubuntu

Gallery

By Stewart Mitchell

Posted on 13 Oct 2011 at 15:06

Ubuntu has taken the wraps off version 11.10 – dubbed Oneiric Ocelot – with few major changes to the open-source operating system.

Oneiric Ocelot updates all major strands of Ubuntu, refining the existing Unity interface that first appeared in the Ubuntu Netbook Edition and tweaking the Dash system-wide search tool.

The release has few major new changes, which isn’t much of a surprise as the next update – 12.04, due next spring – is widely expected to be the long-term support version, meaning developers will be focusing on fixing bugs rather than introducing new features.

The release notes also highlight more of a focus on the cloud and the Ubuntu One service, and support for new ARM subarchitectures.

Ubuntu Server, for example, introduces a technical preview of Juju, which is a tool for service deployment and orchestration on cloud and bare metal environments, and support for the ARM architecture.

For more information ahead of PC Pro’s full review, there’s an online demo of some new features here.

Article source: http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/370513/ubuntu-unveils-oneiric-ocelot-update

Final Ubuntu 11.10 spiffs up Unity, adds ARM server support

Oct. 13, 2011

Ubuntu 11.10 (“Oneiric Ocelot”) was released, featuring makeovers for its Unity desktop and Ubuntu Software Center, a switch to Thunderbird email, and a new Deja Dup backup tool. On the server side, Ubuntu 11.10 adds ARM support, as well as a new “Juju” cloud management framework.

Most of the desktop changes to the Ubuntu 11.10 (“Oneiric Ocelot”) Linux distribution were revealed in the alpha and beta releases, the latter coming in September. However, a few new wrinkles have popped up, and there’s also plenty of server news, including new cloud features, and the first support for ARM-based servers (see farther below).

For the full story, see our Ubuntu 11.10 final coverage in LinuxDevices.


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Article source: http://www.desktoplinux.com/news/NS5819641918.html

Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot is now available

Releasing a new version of an operating system every 6 months may sound like a hard target to hit repeatedly, but Canonical is proving they can do it, and introduce worthwhile new functionality with each new version. Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot is no exception, and as of today you can download it for free, of course.

The buzzwords surrounding 11.10 seem to be integration and refinement. 11.04 was a controversial release mainly due to the introduction of the Unity user interface, which not everyone loved. This release sees that interface refined.

Cosmetically, there’s a new login screen, the two default themes have been updated, and 14 new wallpapers have been included. In terms of interaction, the Dash has been switched to opening via an icon and the color used for the launcher depends on your wallpaper–it changes to better fit with whatever the color tone is, which is a nice touch. The desktop is also easier to bend to your will with new workspace switching options and updated Alt-Tab switcher. Users will also notice the windows controls are now hidden by default, something that may prove to be a sticking point for some like the new scrollbars were.

Performance has also been improved for the interface and users should see a noticeable improvement in the time it takes to load both apps and results. ThereÂ’s also new filtering options built into the DashÂ’s search-driven interface that when combined with Lenses make finding anything easy and very fast.

Speaking of Lenses, UbuntuÂ’s take on organizing related information and search results in a single window, 11.10 has a new addition. Ubuntu is staking its claim on your music library and hopefully music buying too. A Music Lens is now included listing all the music you already have, but it also allows you to search and purchase new music through the Ubuntu One Music Store.

In fact, Ubuntu One has come to the forefront as a major feature and part of the Ubuntu experience in recent months. Windows support has been added, and now we have a music streaming account for access on either an iOS or Android device. ItÂ’s UbuntuÂ’s cloud music service as well as a file storage solution.

Ubuntu One is also taken advantage of for the integrated backup solution Deja Dup. You can set it up to place backups on a hard drive, but also use space on Ubuntu One instead, which may make sense to avoid hard drive failures, but could use up most of your storage allowance.

Other improvements include the Software Center, which has also seen the benefit of new filtering options, a new toolbar, and a layout rethink, all to help make finding new apps much easier for the end user. Another nice feature is the ability to sync your installed apps across multiple machines using OneConf.

As for what you get as default apps, Firefox is the web browser of choice, Thunderbird becomes the preferred email application, and LibreOffice takes care of the office suite. Images are handled by the Shotwell app, and entertainment is handled by the Banshee music player and Totem movie player.

Overall, this looks to be the best version of Ubuntu yet for existing users and those considering the jump from Windows or Mac. If youÂ’re still not convinced then check out the official tour of the new OS in your browser. Otherwise, head on over to the official Ubuntu website and get download the 695MB ISO.

More at Canonical and OMG! Ubuntu


Article source: http://www.geek.com/articles/geek-pick/ubuntu-11-10-oneiric-ocelot-is-now-available-20111013/

Review: For Ubuntu, The Road To 200 Million Desktops Starts With 11.10

The official launch of Ubuntu 11.10, which had been code-named “Oneiric Ocelot,” is the first major launch of the Linux-based OS since its top developer announced an ambitions goal to reach 200 million desktops within a couple of years.

Ubuntu 11.10 became available as early-development alpha software earlier this year, and it was clear from the outset that this operating software has clearly found its stride.

After looking at both the pre-release alpha version as well as the official general release version that launched on Thursday, perhaps the biggest advances are in the general stability of Ubuntu and its efforts to keep up with the marketÂ’s newfound models with its improved app store and streamlined cloud service.

Developers have also included the full-blown version of its graphical, Unity interface — a vertical toolbar on the left pain of the default interface with one-button access to a series of applications and services. This is vastly improved over previous iterations of Unity, although it breaks from previous versions of Ubuntu in that much older hardware with lesser graphics performance may wind up choking on it. (A dual-core processor with 2 GB of memory and on-board graphics should be more than enough to support Unity.)

Otherwise, hereÂ’s whatÂ’s noteworthy in about Ubuntu 11.10 that launched Thursday:

* The Ubuntu Software Center is almost as snappy as Apple’s Mac App Store. It’s very well organized, and designed (including “What’s New” and “Top Rated” applications for download), and it’s an important, streamlined effort to provide value-driven application software to the platform. Remember the days of needing to use line commands to install software on Linux? Those days are history. If you see an application in the Ubuntu Software Center, paid or free, it’s just intuitive and easy to download, install and get working;

* Ubuntu One, which is sort of CanonicalÂ’s version of AppleÂ’s iCloud, works out of the gate. Ubuntu One is built into the Unity navigation bar on the Ubuntu desktop, so youÂ’re always one button away from accessing your files or the ability to upload data to UbuntuÂ’s cloud service;

* LibreOffice, which now takes the place of OpenOffice.org as the default production software in Ubuntu, provides a word processor, spreadsheet program and presentation application — all of which are compatible with Microsoft Office and very fast;

* Ubuntu 11.10, overall, is fast, but no faster than the pre-release Alpha version.

Except for the paid applications in the Ubuntu Software Center and paid storage capacity upgrades to Ubuntu one, Ubuntu 11.10 remains free. As with its most recent versions, it’s more in tune with Mac OS X use patterns than Windows use patterns, including the “X” in the upper left hand corner of applications to close them down, as opposed to the right-hand corner of the application like in Windows.

Ubuntu 11.10 was still less-than-smooth in integration with newer network printers and other devices, though not impossible to integrate.

The bottom line: Ubuntu 11.10 loses no ground with competing desktop operating systems, and continues to be a great option for secondary PCs in an organization — for basic productivity or fixed-function uses.

However, at the same time, Ubuntu has now created an elegant enough, and easy-enough-to-use operating system so that if developers produce enough outstanding applications for the platform – now that the Ubuntu Software Center provides a easy, for-profit channel for ISVs – it could become a significant threat to rivals.

It will take a long road to for Ubuntu to reach 200 million desktops in a market caused by disruption from mobile devices and cloud computing. However, Canonical has established a path it thinks can take it there and Ubuntu 11.10 appears to be an important first step.

Article source: http://www.crn.com/reviews/applications-os/231900787/review-for-ubuntu-the-road-to-200-million-desktops-starts-with-11-10.htm

Ubuntu 11.10 ‘Oneiric Ocelot’ launches

Ubuntu 11.10 launched today at 2pm. If you want to download and install the free Linux operating system, it’s live now at www.ubuntu.com.

Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot follows six months after Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal and is focused heavily on ease of use.

The Unity interface installed in Natty Narwhal has been refined in line with – sometimes negative – user feedback, after its stormy reception last time out.

Unity is a shell interface developed by Ubuntu developer Canonical that first debuted in Ubuntu Netbook Edition. It’s somewhat akin to a mobile or tablet interface, with a vertical application switcher called the Launcher, for instance.

Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot comes with Mozilla Thunderbird as the default email software, and offers Ubuntu One, a personal cloud service giving access to data from Ubuntu and, now, Windows PCs and laptops, as well as Android phones and tablets, and iPhones and iPads.

With Ubuntu One you can stream your music collection to all your devices, or access and share files, documents, and photos. Subscribe to Ubuntu One and you get 5GB of free storage.

Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot contains a backup facility called Deja Dup. This allows business and individual users to back up locally, or in the cloud via Ubuntu One. You can schedule backups and restore from a backup, too.

If you’re interested in Ubuntu Linux and would like to know more, there’s a virtual tour of Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot at www.ubuntu.com/tour.

Article source: http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/linux/3310685/ubuntu-oneiric-ocelot-launches/

Canonical Releases Ubuntu 11.10 Linux Distribution Upgrade

Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot logoCanonical, as expected, launched Ubuntu 11.10 today. Although it seems like just yesterday that Mark Shuttleworth’s announcement of the codename for Ubuntu 11.10 had me googling the terms “oneiric” and “oncelot,” the development cycle of the latest Ubuntu release is officially complete as of today.  That means Canonical has introduced the 15th iteration of the world’s most popular Linux distribution has debuted.  What does that mean for us users?  Here’s a look.

I have to admit: for me, Ubuntu release days have lost some of the excitement they held in the days of yore.  Time there was when I would eagerly download the ISO (via a torrent, of course, to avoid unnecessary load on Canonical’s servers) and install it as soon as I could.  But this time around, I feel no sense of urgency.  I’ll upgrade when I get to it.

This lack of excitement isn’t due to any fault of Canonical’s, though.  On the contrary, it’s because Ubuntu has become so consistent and predictable in its evolution that the release day just doesn’t feel like as big a deal as it used to.  Since the first version of Ubuntu, 4.10 or “Warty Warthog,” appeared seven years ago this month, Canonical has churned out a new release every October and April right on schedule.  (The singular exception was Ubuntu 6.06 LTS, which was deliberately released a bit later than usual, on June 1, 2006.)

Without the constantly shifting release dates and broken promises by software executives that I expect with other operating systems, things just arenÂ’t as fun!

All the same, Canonical’s regularity regarding Ubuntu is a remarkable accomplishment for any software platform.  But it’s particularly impressive in the open-source channel, where a dependency on contributions from volunteers and third-party projects often makes development roadmaps tentative at best.

WhatÂ’s New In Ubuntu 11.10

The fact that Ubuntu 11.10?s release date has been predictably predictable, of course, doesn’t mean that the features of the new operating system itself are dull by any stretch of the imagination.  There’s plenty of new stuff in Oneiric, including but not limited to:

  • Lots of usability enhancements for Unity–which is good, because GNOME 2 is no longer installed by default as a fallback option for users who donÂ’t like the Unity interface.  (An alternative version of Unity which doesnÂ’t require 3D acceleration is available for computers that canÂ’t handle 3D effects.)
  • Firefox 7.0 replaces 6.0 as the default Web browser, andÂ…
  • Mozilla also comes out on top for email, with Evolution removed in favor of Thunderbird as the default mail client.
  • Major enhancements to the Ubuntu Software Center.

An official promotional video highlights some of these updates:

YouTube Preview Image

In addition, changes that might receive less notice from desktop users but which are equally significant for Ubuntu from a broader perspective include:

And there you have it: my own laissez-faire attitude about this release notwithstanding, there are plenty of new features and initiatives to watch for in the Oneiric release.  But don’t take my word for it.  Download it yourself now.

Read More About This Topic

Article source: http://www.thevarguy.com/2011/10/13/canonical-releases-ubuntu-11-10-linux-distribution-upgrade/comment-page-1/

Dreamy Ubuntu 11.10, the Oneiric Ocelot, slinks into view

Ubuntu received a major update today. The developers behind the popular Linux distribution released version 11.10, codenamed Oneiric Ocelot. The update brings a wide range of improvements, including some much-needed enhancements to Ubuntu’s Unity shell.

New Ubuntu releases are issued every six months in conformance with the distribution’s time-based development cycle. The agenda for version 11.10 was announced back in March, shortly before the release of version 11.04. Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth chose the codename Oneiric Ocelot to reflect the 11.10 cycle’s dual emphasis on daydreams and discipline.

The 11.04 release was a major milestone because it introduced some radical changes to the Ubuntu desktop experience. As we wrote in our review, Unity exhibited enormous potential but fell short of expectations due to some weak areas. During the past six months, the developers have been working hard to close key gaps in the shell implementation.

As a result of their efforts, the Unity environment feels more robust in Ubuntu 11.10. The solid support for a work-alike 2D fallback for the shell is a particularly big step forward, ensuring that users can still get the Unity experience even if their graphics hardware doesn’t support compositing.

The Unity dash is a bit cleaner in 11.10 and gained a new panel for music search and playback that is designed to integrate with the Banshee audio player. The menus in the top right-hand corner of the screen have been streamlined and reorganized so that they are easier to navigate.

Although Unity has come a long way, there are still some areas where mediocre design compromises Unity’s intended usability advantages. The eccentric application launcher, for example, is still a sore spot in an otherwise elegant desktop.

Under the hood

Aside from Unity-related developments, there are a lot of other compelling changes in Ubuntu 11.10.

Mozilla’s Thunderbird mail client has replaced Evolution as Ubuntu’s default e-mail application. The GNOME login manager used in previous versions of Ubuntu has been replaced in 11.10 with the more flexible LightDM, skinned with a distinctive Unity-like style. The Gwibber social networking client got a major front-end overhaul that improves performance and brings a more native look and feel. Typography got another nice boost in the new version with the addition of an official Ubuntu monotype.

Under the hood, Ubuntu 11.10 uses version 3.0 of the Linux kernel and many components from GNOME 3.2. The legacy GNOME desktop environment, which was available as an alternate login session in 11.04, is no longer part of the default Ubuntu installation in 11.10 (but users who want it can still get it from the repositories).

Alongside the 11.10 development cycle, Canonical built a new Ubuntu developer website that provides technical reference material for third-party application developers. Although the developer documentation effort is still ramping up, the site is already stocked with some useful resources for programmers who are interested in building software that integrates with Ubuntu. The site discusses packaging conventions, development tools, Ubuntu APIs, and application deployment.

The ability to sell programs to Ubuntu users through the Ubuntu Software Center could make the platform a more appealing target for commercial software developers than it has been historically. The new developer site offers a useful starting point to educate developers about how they can take advantage of the opportunity that Ubuntu presents for growing their audience.

Now that Ubuntu 11.10 is ready for consumption, the developers will shift their focus to the next major version: Ubuntu 12.04, which is scheduled for release in April. Earlier this month, Shuttleworth announced that the codename for 12.04 will be Precise Pangolin. Ubuntu 12.04 is a long-term support release, which means that it will be supported with updates for five years on servers and three years on desktops.

The pangolin is a kind of scaly anteater with considerable defensive capabilities—they can curl up into a spiny ball and emit a foul-smelling odor when threatened. In the naming announcement, Shuttleworth joked that pangolins have been known to survive encounters with lions—a reference to the latest version of Apple’s Mac OS X operating system, which is codenamed Lion. Much like its namesake, Precise Pangolin is intended to be a highly robust release as the development cycle will focus on stabilization. It is a good name, but doesn’t quite inspire the same awe and technical confidence as “Beefy Miracle,” the majestic codename of Fedora 17.

Users can download the new version of Ubuntu today from the project’s website. For additional details, you can refer to the launch announcement and official release notes. Stay tuned for our in-depth review, which will stalk out of the forest soon.

Article source: http://arstechnica.com/open-source/news/2011/10/dreamy-ubuntu-1110-the-oneiric-ocelot-slinks-into-view.ars

domain registration


You don’t do domain name registration without first knowing what your website is about. You want to get that right the first time around. The wrong type of registration will look bad on you and your business, and you don’t want that. As important as your business is, so also should your domain name be, especially when you are considering doing lots of business online.

Having been on the internet quite a bit, you should be very clear what you want. Before doing domain name registration, you should have it all down to the type of domain you really want. If you don’t, you have some extra homework to do. As they say in just about every aspect of life – those who fail to plan are only planning to fail. This also applies to domain registration.

Since it is your own domain name, you know what you want for sure. If the registration service is not doing it right for you, you have a right to call off the deal. There’s no reason to pay for substandard service. And the fact that there are tons of other registration companies out there, it ensures that you don’t waste time with one that is not doing things right. The good news is that lots of the others are very good, so you have lots to choose from, rather than stay with a bad company.

Selecting a domain name for your website is easy enough; finding one is the hard part. It really is not that big a world, even on the internet. A lot of people have similar ideas all the time, and many of them have migrated their businesses online earlier than you have. But if you use some of the good domain tools out there they can help you find the right domain name.

You may have a lot of domain name options in mind, but they could all be wrong, and you may never find that out until you are just about to make a listing for yourself online. You should check them all out on the internet before getting registered so that such mistakes don’t happen. If not all the options you have in mind are available, you need to get the right ones. This can be difficult but it’s a choice you have to make. Your call.
Blackpool Web Design

Blackpool Web Design

Article source: http://www.zimbio.com/Domain+Names/articles/3-cf85-lunz/domain+registration

More domain names should lower prices, increase innovation

Internet domain names are on the threshold of a sweeping change. Instead of being confined to a handful of extensions such as .com or .org, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) will allow any word to be registered as a domain name extension, or generic top-level domain (gTLD), as they are known. Rod Beckstrom, president and chief executive officer, ICANN, who calls it the “largest opening in the history of the Internet”, in an interview in India said this will lead to innovations that can’t even be imagined today. Advertisers and marketers are critical of the move as they say it could lead to a spurt in litigation over cyber squatting. Edited excerpts:

You have said opening up gTLDs will increase competition and reduce prices. Is that the idea behind the move?

We think it should reduce prices (of domain names) because there will be more choices and because the new operators can choose their prices where they wish to. We also think there could be very significant innovations coming out, and itÂ’s hard to forecast where those are going to go. But every time in the history of technology you create a new opening, you have innovations. People use technology in the most creative way and this is the most significant opening at the top level in the history (of the Internet). So, how it is going to mix with media, how it is going to mix with IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6), and having so many devices of different types, it would be very interesting.

How did the idea come about?

The idea came about in the 1990s. When parties were looking at creating ICANN, one of the concerns was with .com for example. (The) .com registry had so much power, it was a primary choice, then there was some concept written about ICANN, and in those initial documents, it talked about generic top-level domain names which generated interest in the global Internet community in having more and it certainly represents the largest opening in history in generic top-level names, and it is a far more complex programme.

So is there a categorization in terms of what can be registered, or is it open to imagination?

There is a set of rules; the rules really determine which applications are likely to go through or what the qualifications are for the applicants and in terms of strings (domain name extensions), any string can be applied for. But what the applicants have to think about is (that) the parties can also file objections. So, if they are trying to use the string that somebody else owns, if you are you violating somebody’s trademark or service mark, you are going to have problems. So you may not want to spend all this money on an application. One application costs $185,000. In case of cities, there are rules. So capital cities, for example, like New Delhi, it can be applied for only in India, but the party is going to need a letter of no objection from the relevant government bodies. So someone might apply for New Delhi in some other country of the world; they won’t be able to apply—capital city names are protected, for example. For other cities, if someone filed a community-based application with city name, they still need to have the support or a letter of no objection suggesting that they represent the community. Now, in some cases, city names are the same as product names. In that case, a community-based application will get preference.

What is the time frame we are talking about here?

The window for applications will be open from January 2012 till April 2012. We will publish a list of strings by May, so that anyone who has a problem can check the list and send objections. The first set of names should be given out by the end of 2012.

Several advertisers and marketers are opposed to the idea as they think it will lead to a lot of litigation.

We don’t seek to convince anyone on anything except that our practices have been fair. The only thing that an organization has to do is to act in the global public interest and conduct its policy development practices in a transparent way, and we have done that. The documentation is absolutely extensive—thousands of pages that address different needs. Now that it’s been developed by the global Internet community, our job is to make sure that we are absolutely fair and non-partial.

Do you agree that there will be increased litigation and cyber squatting?

There have been disputes over domain names ever since they appeared on the Internet. So the disputes wonÂ’t stop. Domain names are unique names, and in being unique, they are scarce. And in being scarce, parties have different economic interests. So thatÂ’s what so many protections have been put in place for. Having said that, there will always be disputes and different opinions. Our job is to make sure we do the best job at the protection of interests.

What about cases where multiple applications with the same name are received?

All the applicants have to go through checks, financial checks, background checks, criminal checks, etc. If they pass all that, community applications will have preference over standard applications. But in case none of the applicants are community, then in that case, it depends on whether they have a trademark. The organization with a trademark will get preference over others. But if all of them have trademarks in different categories, then they all pass through; they will be notified that they all have passed to the point where they can find a solution among themselves. If they are not able to reach any solution, then it will go to the auction and the name will be given to the highest bidder. The money from the auction would go to non-profit activities and will not go back to ICANN.

surabhi.a@livemint.com

Article source: http://www.livemint.com/2011/10/13224044/More-domain-names-should-lower.html?atype=tp

VeriSign Withdraws Request To Suspend Malicious Domains

In a bizarre twist of events, VeriSign has now withdrawn a controversial request it submitted to ICANN earlier this week to suspend domains that harbor botnets and malware.

VeriSign had petitioned the ICANN Registry Request Service for the authority to suspend known malicious domains with having to first obtain a court order, and to scan its registrars’ domains. The top-level domain provider for com, .net, and .name, has now killed its proposed Anti-Abuse Domain Use Policy, an ICANN spokesman confirmed. The ICANN website today lists the proposal as “withdrawn.”

VeriSign was unavailable for comment at the time of this posting.

In a request submitted to ICANN this week, VeriSign had proposed a new domain-suspension policy that would “facilitate takedown of malicious sites,” as well as a new free and optional malware-scanning service for its domain registrars to help them identify malware in their domains.

Domain providers and registrars are increasingly under pressure to weed out malicious domains that support botnets and other cybercriminal activities. Microsoft early last year secured a federal court order that basically required VeriSign to shut down 277 .com domains that were serving as the connections between the massive Waledac spamming botnet’s command and control servers. The move was unprecedented, and helped streamline the process of dismantling the botnet in a sneak attack by Microsoft, VeriSign, Shadowserver, the University of Washington and a group of researchers from Germany and Austria who previously had infiltrated the botnet.

Shutting down the domains of Waledac, which had amassed some 60,000- to 80,000 bots, provided a precedent for botnet-fighters to take down other botnets, security experts said at the time. But the court-order process can waste precious time in a surprise-attack takedown, and bypassing that step could help streamline the process of knocking cybercriminal operations offline.

“All parts of the internet community are feeling the pressure to be more proactive in dealing with malicious activity. ICANN has recognized this and the new gTLD Applicant Guidebook requires new gTLDs to adopt a clear definition of rapid takedown or suspension systems that will be implemented. To address concerns over malware, Verisign is seeking to (i) provide a malware scanning service to assist registrars in identifying legitimate sites that have been infected and (ii) establish an anti-abuse policy to facilitate the takedown of abusive non-legitimate sites,” VeriSign’s now-defunct proposal said.

VeriSign wanted to be able to deny, cancel, or transfer any domain registration or transaction, and to put any domain name on hold or another suspended status for various purposes, including: “to protect the integrity, security and stability of the DNS; to comply with any applicable court orders, laws, government rules or requirements, requests of law enforcement or other governmental or quasi-governmental agency, or any dispute resolution process; to avoid any liability, civil or criminal, on the part of Verisign, as well as its affiliates, subsidiaries, officers, directors, and employees” as well as for any malware issues, according to the document.

It was unclear whether legitimate sites could inadvertently be shut down if they were unknowingly harboring malware. But VeriSign had said it would offer a protest process for legitimate website owners who feel their sites was incorrectly suspended, and notes that “various” law enforcement officials “have validated” its proposed plan for stemming domain-name abuse.

“VeriSign is sort of between a rock and a hard place. The DNS is the most stable namespace in the world, making it attractive for the entire spectrum of users. Where is the line drawn? Wherever that is, VeriSign would probably prefer not to get sued over it,” says researcher and DNS security expert Dan Kaminsky, of the proposal before it was withdrawn.

A copy of VeriSign’s now defunct-proposal to ICANN is available here.

Have a comment on this story? Please click “Add Your Comment” below. If you’d like to contact Dark Reading’s editors directly, send us a message.

Article source: http://www.darkreading.com/insider-threat/167801100/security/vulnerabilities/231900792/verisign-withdraws-request-to-suspend-malicious-domains.html

Rod Beckstrom | More domain names should lower prices, increase innovation

New Delhi: Internet domain names are on the threshold of a sweeping change. Instead of being confined to a handful of extensions such as .com or .org, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) will allow any word to be registered as a domain name extension, or generic top-level domain (gTLD), as they are known. Rod Beckstrom, president and chief executive officer, ICANN, who calls it the “largest opening in the history of the Internet”, in an interview in India said this will lead to innovations that can’t even be imagined today. Advertisers and marketers are critical of the move as they say it could lead to a spurt in litigation over cyber squatting. Edited excerpts:

You have said opening up gTLDs will increase competition and reduce prices. Is that the idea behind the move?

Web rules: Beckstrom says there is a set of rules to determine which applications could go through and the qualifications for applicants. Photo: Ramesh Pathania/Mint

We think it should reduce prices (of domain names) because there will be more choices and because the new operators can choose their prices where they wish to. We also think there could be very significant innovations coming out, and itÂ’s hard to forecast where those are going to go. But every time in the history of technology you create a new opening, you have innovations. People use technology in the most creative way and this is the most significant opening at the top level in the history (of the Internet). So, how it is going to mix with media, how it is going to mix with IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6), and having so many devices of different types, it would be very interesting.

How did the idea come about?

The idea came about in the 1990s. When parties were looking at creating ICANN, one of the concerns was with .com for example. (The) .com registry had so much power, it was a primary choice, then there was some concept written about ICANN, and in those initial documents, it talked about generic top-level domain names which generated interest in the global Internet community in having more and it certainly represents the largest opening in history in generic top-level names, and it is a far more complex programme.

So is there a categorization in terms of what can be registered, or is it open to imagination?

There is a set of rules; the rules really determine which applications are likely to go through or what the qualifications are for the applicants and in terms of strings (domain name extensions), any string can be applied for. But what the applicants have to think about is (that) the parties can also file objections. So, if they are trying to use the string that somebody else owns, if you are you violating somebody’s trademark or service mark, you are going to have problems. So you may not want to spend all this money on an application. One application costs $185,000. In case of cities, there are rules. So capital cities, for example, like New Delhi, it can be applied for only in India, but the party is going to need a letter of no objection from the relevant government bodies. So someone might apply for New Delhi in some other country of the world; they won’t be able to apply—capital city names are protected, for example. For other cities, if someone filed a community-based application with city name, they still need to have the support or a letter of no objection suggesting that they represent the community. Now, in some cases, city names are the same as product names. In that case, a community-based application will get preference.

What is the time frame we are talking about here?

The window for applications will be open from January 2012 till April 2012. We will publish a list of strings by May, so that anyone who has a problem can check the list and send objections. The first set of names should be given out by the end of 2012.

Several advertisers and marketers are opposed to the idea as they think it will lead to a lot of litigation.

We don’t seek to convince anyone on anything except that our practices have been fair. The only thing that an organization has to do is to act in the global public interest and conduct its policy development practices in a transparent way, and we have done that. The documentation is absolutely extensive—thousands of pages that address different needs. Now that it’s been developed by the global Internet community, our job is to make sure that we are absolutely fair and non-partial.

Do you agree that there will be increased litigation and cyber squatting?

There have been disputes over domain names ever since they appeared on the Internet. So the disputes wonÂ’t stop. Domain names are unique names, and in being unique, they are scarce. And in being scarce, parties have different economic interests. So thatÂ’s what so many protections have been put in place for. Having said that, there will always be disputes and different opinions. Our job is to make sure we do the best job at the protection of interests.

What about cases where multiple applications with the same name are received?

All the applicants have to go through checks, financial checks, background checks, criminal checks, etc. If they pass all that, community applications will have preference over standard applications. But in case none of the applicants are community, then in that case, it depends on whether they have a trademark. The organization with a trademark will get preference over others. But if all of them have trademarks in different categories, then they all pass through; they will be notified that they all have passed to the point where they can find a solution among themselves. If they are not able to reach any solution, then it will go to the auction and the name will be given to the highest bidder. The money from the auction would go to non-profit activities and will not go back to ICANN.

surabhi.a@livemint.com

Article source: http://www.livemint.com/2011/10/14010727/Rod-Beckstrom--More-domain-na.html

The Quick Demise of Qwikster – E

The superstar movie rental giant Netflix (Nasdaq: NFLX) rapidly graduated to movie streaming
and suddenly
splintered off its old-fashioned DVD-by-mail service to create “Qwikster,” a separate division with a name identity inspired by the likes of “Twitter” and “Napster,” etc.

When the outcry of customers reached the boardroom, the objections over account access, dual billings and having to deal with two separate unrelated
name identities overwhelmed the management, and the wisdom kicked in.

Qwikster was quickly withdrawn.

“It is clear that for many of our members two websites would make things more
difficult, so we are going to keep Netflix as one place to go for streaming and
DVDs,” Netflix CEO Reed Hastings said in his blog. “This means no change: one website, one account, one password.”

In other words, no Qwikster.

This is a good move indeed, as Qwikster would have become a major name identity
liability and a branding nightmare. Creating divisional identities, spinoffs
of operations and divestures all require a very delicate understanding of corporate nomenclature.

It’s very easy to find the names quickly, but to disrupt perceptions
and influence the human nature side of “name usability” is very complex. Here is one major new emerging front that will topple traditional thinking on market domination via name identities.

Understanding the Difference Between a Pyramid and a Root

A typical domain name is a pyramid. For example, under “www.ibm.com” the entire universe of IBM (NYSE: IBM) is parked. The company’s history; products and services; management; global offices; investment and stock-related information; human resources; public relations; community services; staffing; and hundreds of other items are all nicely arranged like a pyramid.

There is only one www.ibm.com domain name, and it belongs to IBM. Great, so, what’s so special about it? Millions of other companies are doing the same thing. Just hold that thought for a minute.

The ICANN’s gTLD brand is a root. Say IBM acquires “.ibm,” and it selectively
creates a series of subdomain-name cyberbrands: “mainframe.ibm,” “cloud.ibm,” “delhi.ibm,” “hr.ibm,” or “shares.ibm.” The variations are endless, and for a global player, they could offer geo-socio-cybercontact subdomain connections all over the world.

As a root, the gTLD name brand grows into a tree with branches and provides a
more flexible and end-user friendly setup.

If mass customer acquisitions and outreaching cybercustomer touch are the next
challenges for the ever-expanding universe of online users, then such roots play
a far more advanced game then the traditional single domain name stacked up with
content like a pyramid.

The management has two options: Either just keep the pyramid and keep adding
to its solo structure, or start thinking about the free-flowing growth of a root
into many different branches to strategically interlink or uplink and become
a large tree. In either case, performance will be dramatically different.

Ignorance Breeds Fear

Naysayers all over the world are already blasting ICANN over its gTLD program,
but their fears are based on a lack of understanding and readily available
skills to adjust to this global shift toward large-scale cybername identity
management.

The subject gets even more complex for global entities when there are too many
subdivisions within too many sub-brands, each with a splintered name identity
already polluting the market place — and that’s where proper rules have be applied to harmonize corporate nomenclature.

What would have happened if the gTLD “.netflix” existed? Would “stream.netflix”
and “dvd.netflix” have provided highly unified single brand name equity, with the
same back end? Similarly, with its own root domain, Netflix could offer country-specific identities like “canada.netflix” — and just keep adding targeted countries. The company’s execs are smart, and they will decide the right thing.

Today, serious marketers have to come to grips with new ideas and selectively abandon the elements of their traditional education that are no longer relevant in favor of mastering the new emerging platforms. The next battle is
all about mass customer acquisition and mass customer touchpoints achieved
by practicing market domination via name identity.

At this level of complexity, this topic is not discussed at universities or in MBA programs anywhere in the world — and for this reason alone, there is unwarranted confusion and fear about the new platforms.

ICANN will be accepting gTLD brand applications starting Jan. 12, 2012.


Naseem Javed, founder of
ABC Namebank, is a globally recognized authority on corporate nomenclature and related issues of market domination via name identity. He is a lecturer, syndicated columnist, and the author of
Naming for Power.

Article source: http://www.ecommercetimes.com/story/The-Quick-Demise-of-Qwikster-73478.html

People News — Oct. 14

CALIFORNIA

Andrew Fuller has been promoted to senior vice president in the Assurance Services Group of Perry-Smith LLP, Sacramento and San Francisco.

 

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COLORADO

Barry Levine has joined Hein Associates, Denver, as a director in business advisory services. … John Carpenter has joined KPMG LLP as a partner in the MA tax practice in Denver. He will also support teams assisting private equity clients in the San Francisco market.

 

CONNECTICUT

Michael Belsky has resigned as one of six part-time members of the Governmental Accounting Standards Board. He accepted a position with an investment advisory firm.

 

ILLINOIS

Neil Furmanski has joined KPMG LLP as a federal tax managing director in Chicago. … Martin Battaglia has joined Deloitte Corporate Finance LLC as a leader in the national capital advisory practice. He will be based in Chicago. … Jakob J. Thompson, an audit and tax senior at Sikich LLP, Rockford, has received the Illinois State University College of Business Early Career Achievement Award, which recognizes young alumni who have demonstrated innovative and responsible professional leadership and the potential for future distinction. … Matt Becker, Steve Ferrara, Kathy Kopczick and Chris Smith have each been elected to the Board of Directors of BDO USA LLP, Chicago. Becker, Kopczick and Smith were elected to full three-year terms, while Ferrara will serve a one-year term as he completes the term of a departing board member.

 

KENTUCKY

Amy Miles has been promoted to director at Louis T. Roth Co., Louisville.

 

MARYLAND

Gary Perlow has been named regional managing principal of the East Region at Reznick Group. The firm’s East Region consists of the Baltimore, Bethesda, Boston, and Tysons Corner, Va., offices. Perlow was previously co-office managing principal for the Baltimore office, and is being succeeded in that role by principal Ira Weinstein. Separately, senior manager Carmen Graves has been named one of the 2011 Leading Women by The (Maryland) Daily Record in recognition of her professional experience, community involvement and commitment to inspiring change. … Bond Beebe, Bethesda, announced a number of promotions: Caroline Kettering has been promoted to senior audit manager; Brian Wynne to senior tax manager; Jason Edwards and Ravi Melwani to audit manager; and Phil Green to senior in the Audit Department.

 

MICHIGAN

Kevin Flattery has been named office managing partner for the Ann Arbor office of Plante Moran, succeeding Michael Swartz, who will now lead the firm’s governmental accounting professionals practice team.

 

MISSISSIPPI

Jeffrey Davidson of Jackson was named Franchisee of the Year by Jackson Hewitt Tax Service at its annual convention.

 

NEW JERSEY

Timothy Larson has joined WithumSmith+Brown as a tax partner in the New Brunswick office.

 

NEW YORK

Steven Wolpow, co-managing partner of Nussbaum Yates Berg Klein Wolpow LLP, Melville, has been named a member of the AICPA‘s 2011-2012 Professional Personal Liability Insurance Committee. … David A. Shuster, a tax principal at Grassi Co., Jericho, has been inducted into Long Island Business News‘ Leadership In Law Class of 2011 in the In-house Counsel Category. … Guy Sanschagrin has joined the transfer pricing practice of WTP Advisors, White Plains. … Jeffrey Solomon has been named chief executive officer of Cowen and Co., New York. … Martin Leventhal, co-chairman of the Business Investigative and Insolvency Group of Rosen Seymour Shapss Martin Co. LLP, has been re-elected president of Harbor Childcare Inc.Thomas Agnello has joined Freed Maxick Battaglia CPAs/RSM McGladrey, Rochester, as client relationship executive. … James J. Wienclaw has rejoined the Long Island office of Marcum LLP as a partner. … Professor Peter Wolnizer has been confirmed as chair of the International Accounting Education Standards Board by the Public Interest Oversight Board.

 

OHIO

Ciuni Panichi Inc., Cleveland, announced a number of new hires: Brett Benjamin has joined the firm as audit staff, Lisa Pipkin as tax staff, and Jennifer Herbison as a tax senior. … SSG announced a number of new hires: In Cleveland, Brian D. Jones and Seth Weinstein have joined the firm as a manager and an associate, respectively, in the Assurance Department. In the Akron office, Linda Phillips has joined the firm as an associate in the Tax Department; Evan Pestello and Jonathan McGarity as associates in the Assurance Department; and Carrie O’Neill as manager of clinical research for Ohio Clinical Research Partners at SSG Healthcare Services LLC, and Lee Anne Graefnitz as a billing specialist. In the Cincinnati office, Samantha Koeppe has joined the firm as an associate in the Assurance Department.

 

PENNSYLVANIA

Chris Barbier has joined Smart Devine, Philadelphia, as director of technology services in the business advisory practice. … Katie E. Perry has been promoted to advanced staff accountant at Herbein + Co. Inc., Greensburg. … Ryan Orman has joined ERP software vendor Deacom, Wayne, as a junior software developer, while Stephanie Eaves has joined the company as a marketing communications specialist. … Steven Franckhauser has joined Hill, Barth King LLC, Pittsburgh, as director of HBK Energy. … Thomas Barber has joined the Horsham office of WeiserMazars LLP as a partner.

 

TEXAS

Barbara de Marigny has joined the MA tax practice of KPMG LLP as a managing director, based in Houston.

 

VIRGINIA

Chris Perszyk-Cox, an analyst at Honeywell International, has received the 2011 Excellence in Accounting and Finance Award for Outstanding Achievement from the American Society of Women Accountants. … Peter Raymond, a principal at PwC US, has been named the firm’s capital projects and infrastructure practice leader for the firm. He is based in McLean, and succeeds Carter Pate, who recently retired.

 

WASHINGTON, D.C.

The Internal Revenue Service has selected four new members and a chairman for its Electronic Tax Administration Advisory Committee. The new members are Timothy Blevins, Cyrus Daftary, Yasmine Nolan and Timur Taluy, while Mark Steber has been elected chairman for 2011-2012. … Karen Roche has been named a principal at Calibre CPA Group PLLC, Washington, D.C.

Send your personnel announcements to AcToday@SourceMedia.com.

Article source: http://www.accountingtoday.com/news/People-News-October-14-60455-1.html?CMP=OTC-RSS

Now there’s a list of Ubuntu-certified computers

Ubuntu Certified

Trying to figure out whether your computer supports a specific Linux-based operating system can be something of a crap-shoot. While most PCs that ship with Windows feature a sticker on the box that says theyÂ’re certified to run the operating system, you often wonÂ’t know if your computer has a funky wireless card or unsupported graphics driver until you try to load Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSUSE or another Linux distro and find out that it just doesnÂ’t work.

Now Canonical is making things a lot easier for anyone looking for a PC that supports Ubuntu Linux. The company has started a certification program with top computer makers including Acer, Asus, Dell, Lenovo, HP, and Toshiba. You can find a complete list of certified computers at the Ubuntu website.

Not surprisingly, Linux PC builder System76 has a few computers that made the cut. But there are a whopping 98 Dell laptops on the list, as well as 46 desktop computers, 8 netbooks, and 46 servers.

Lenovo and Toshiba also have a number of Ubuntu certified devices, and there are 8 Asus netbooks on the list.

That isn’t to say that the computers on Canonical’s list are the only systems you can run Ubuntu Linux on. But if you buy one of these computers there’s a pretty good chance you won’t have to pull your hair out trying to figure out how to add WLAN support.

via Hacker News

Article source: http://liliputing.com/2011/10/now-theres-a-list-of-ubuntu-certified-computers.html

Ubuntu One client now available for Windows

Canonical has moved its Ubuntu One file-synchronization service for Windows out of beta, with the new build of the operating system.

Ubuntu One gives users 5GB of free cloud storage that allows files and music to be selectively synchronized on Ubuntu, Android, iOS, and now Windows devices. Users can buy 20GB of extra storage at $2.99 a month or $29.99 a year, with a music-streaming service holding 20GB costing $3.99 a month or $39.99 a year also available.

“We have long received feedback from Ubuntu users regarding their evolving needs to manage all their content from a single, secure place across multiple platforms and devices,” said Canonical in a blog posting. “Many people have to work in Windows or Mac environments, even if they prefer to use Ubuntu as their home desktop or OS of choice.”

The Windows client was released in beta format in November and has been under rapid development ever since. The company didnÂ’t say if such a client would be available for Mac OS X users, but did comment that it was committed to a multi-platform strategy, and that the new Windows release is one part of that.

Other changes for client-side users of the new Ubuntu build include better support for low-powered systems, with the Unity interface available in 2D when needed. The Evolution email client has been replaced with the more mature Mozilla Thunderbird, and the whole operating system now supports ARM-powered devices on both client and server sides. ®

Article source: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/10/13/ubuntu_one_available_windows/

Ubuntu Linux 11.10: Unity comes of age (Review)

Welcome to Ubuntu 11.10, Oneiric Ocelot, country.

Welcome to Ubuntu 11.10, Oneiric Ocelot, country.

When Canonical, UbuntuÂ’s parent company first announced that it was going to drop the GNOME 3.x desktop for its own GNOME-based desktop take, Unity, a lot of people were unhappy. They also werenÂ’t thrilled with UnityÂ’s first mainstream deployment in Ubuntu 11.04. Now, if these same people, if they give the brand new Ubuntu 11.10 desktop a try, I think theyÂ’ll really like this new Ubuntu.

DonÂ’t get me wrong. Unity still isnÂ’t for everyone. Hard core Linux desktop users-and IÂ’m one of them-will still find it keeps them too far away from LinuxÂ’s fine-tuning controls for comfort. But, for everyone else, I think Unity may be the best pure desktop Linux desktop interface IÂ’ve ever used. And friends, as the former editor-in-chief of DesktopLinux and a Linux user since its early days, IÂ’ve seen all of them.

What am I talking about, well letÂ’s take a look at the new Ubuntu and IÂ’ll show you what IÂ’m talking about.

Meeting and Installing Ubuntu

Installing Ubuntu can be done by anyone with a pulse who knows how to burn an image to a CD or USB stick. Once upon a time, say the 20th century, Linux was hard to install. Now, anyone can do it. DonÂ’t believe me? Download a copy of the new Ubuntu for yourself and follow along my installation path in Gallery: Installing the latest Ubuntu Linux: Ubuntu 11.10 and youÂ’ll see what I mean.

For my testing purposes, I installed Ubuntu on a 2009-era Gateway DX4710. This PC is powered by a 2.5-GHz Intel Core 2 Quad processor and has 6GBs of RAM and an Intel GMA (Graphics Media Accelerator) 3100 for graphics. ItÂ’s not the fastest computer out there, but then you donÂ’t need a lot of speed for Ubuntu. I also ran the new Ubuntu, Oneiric Ocelot, on a VirtualBox virtual machine. Ubuntu can live very happily with other operating systems so you can install it on a Windows XP or 7 box and dual-boot it.

If that seems too much for you, you can always take a tour of the new Ubuntu with CanonicalÂ’s Ubuntu online tour. ItÂ’s the next best thing to actually running Ubuntu.

Say Hello to Unity

If Unity looks like itÂ’s meant to be a tablet interface, well keep watching. I expect it will be some day. In the meantime, it wasnÂ’t so much as any big change about Unity thatÂ’s convinced me that itÂ’s a winner as the accumulated effect of all the small improvements.

Unity was always pretty, but it was also always fragile. Using it felt like trying to walk through a china shop. You felt like if you made one wrong move, youÂ’d break something. And, chances are you would bust something sooner or later. Oh, and did I mention it was slow? Well, it was.

Today, Unity looks even better than ever. Better still, IÂ’m finding it to be both fast and quite stable. IÂ’ve been running Ubuntu 11.10 in beta for weeks now and IÂ’ve yet to see a real problem. In addition, Unity 2D, the default desktop if you donÂ’t have the graphic acceleration you need for full-scale Unity, looks and feels pretty much the same as its big brother interface.

There have also been some changes in UnityÂ’s desktop geography. The Dash application, which serves as a dual purpose desktop search engine and file and program manager now lives on from the top of the Unity menu Launcher. Dash, with its instant search feature is quite handy. Its new finder filter options are also quite useful. So, for example, you can search for particular file types from within Dash.

Ubuntu makes it easy to switch from one desktop, or one app, to another.

Ubuntu makes it easy to switch from one desktop, or one app, to another.

Linux has long supported multiple desktops, but Ubuntu makes it easier than ever to get to them. With all you need do is simultaneously hit the Alt and Tab keys or the Alt and Grave keys to switch between applications or application windows. Once youÂ’re in the multiple application window, you use the tab key to hop from one application to another. If like me, you have one window for e-mail, another for social networks, and so on, this can be a real time saver.

The over-all effect of the new Unity is that it just makes me doing your day-in, day-out computing work so darn easy. Is it great for getting down and dirty with your operating system? No, no itÂ’s not. But, if you want to quickly, and without fuss or bother, go about your work or keep yourself entertained, itÂ’s a great interface.

Page 2: [New Ubuntu Basics] »

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-source/ubuntu-linux-1110-unity-comes-of-age-review/9744