Ubuntu sign Mosiatlhaga, Jacobs, Williams, Goss, Chirinda … – Kick Off

Posted: 18 August 2017
Time: 11:15

Ubuntu Cape Town have confirmed a raft of new signings, including former SuperSport United midfielder Tshepo Mosiatlhaga, Malcolm Jacobs, Chaz Williams and Dillon Goss.

Mosiatlhaga has joined the club from Matsatsantsa after making a positive impression during pre-season.

Jacobs, a former Highlands Park and Mbombela United shot-stopper, penned a deal with Ubuntu after impressing last season with the Limpopo outfit. Kyle Davids, 22, makes up the goalkeeping department having previously been with the Milano reserves.

Williams, a 22-year-old Bidvest Wits academy product and South Africa U-20 international, partners fellow recruit and left-back Mhlengi ‘Shaka’ Sgwibela, 25, who joins from Santos.

The attacking options are further strengthened with the arrival of Goss, 22, from Chippa and winger Obriel Chirinda. Chirinda, 20, has experience in the Zimbabwean topflight alongside Bukhosi Sibanda at Bantu Rovers.

The midfield is rounded up by 21-year-old Ajax Cape Town youth product Olwethu Nguye.

The NFD newcomers also recently added Ethen Sampson, Lebohang Motumi, Sibanda and Taahir Ganga to their ranks, as well as promoted trio Jesse Donn, Luke Fleurs and Ryan Serfontein.

Tags:  PSL Transfer News

Article source: http://www.kickoff.com/news/78138/ubuntu-sign-mosiatlhaga-jacobs-williams-goss-chirinda-sgwibela-

Ubuntu confirm new signings

Posted: 18 August 2017
Time: 11:15

Ubuntu Cape Town have confirmed a raft of new signings, including former SuperSport United midfielder Tshepo Mosiatlhaga, Malcolm Jacobs, Chaz Williams and Dillon Goss.

Mosiatlhaga has joined the club from Matsatsantsa after making a positive impression during pre-season.

Jacobs, a former Highlands Park and Mbombela United shot-stopper, penned a deal with Ubuntu after impressing last season with the Limpopo outfit. Kyle Davids, 22, makes up the goalkeeping department having previously been with the Milano reserves.

Williams, a 22-year-old Bidvest Wits academy product and South Africa U-20 international, partners fellow recruit and left-back Mhlengi ‘Shaka’ Sgwibela, 25, who joins from Santos.

The attacking options are further strengthened with the arrival of Goss, 22, from Chippa and winger Obriel Chirinda. Chirinda, 20, has experience in the Zimbabwean topflight alongside Bukhosi Sibanda at Bantu Rovers.

The midfield is rounded up by 21-year-old Ajax Cape Town youth product Olwethu Nguye.

The NFD newcomers also recently added Ethen Sampson, Lebohang Motumi, Sibanda and Taahir Ganga to their ranks, as well as promoted trio Jesse Donn, Luke Fleurs and Ryan Serfontein.

Tags:  PSL Transfer News

Article source: http://www.kickoff.com/news/78138/ubuntu-confirm-new-signings

Happening nearby: Ubuntu on Saturday, Aug. 19 to feature live performances, cultural expression

Community members are invited to join the NAACP of Snohomish County and City of Lynnwood during Ubuntu.

The event on Saturday, Aug. 19 will feature live performances, cultural expression and spoken word performances. Peformers include Jerod Grant, The Quil Ceda Tulalip Elementary Drummers Singers and Thione Diop.

Ubuntu will run from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 19 at Wilcox Park, 5215 196th St. S.W. in Lynnwood.

For more information, click here.

Article source: http://mltnews.com/happening-nearby-ubuntu-saturday-aug-19-feature-live-performances-cultural-expression/

SteamOS vs. Ubuntu vs. Windows 10: Which Is The Best Operating System For Gaming?

Short Bytes: Several operating systems have been developed for a broad range of purposes, but, currently, there are only three best operating systems for gaming: SteamOS, Ubuntu and Windows 10. Naturally, all three will have varied gaming performance between them, and it is our job to provide you with accurate information on which OS to use if your primary usage will be for long gaming sessions. At the end of the day, it will also come down to the user’s preference.

Years ago, MS-DOS was the ‘go to’ operating system when you wanted to engage in prolonged gaming sessions but its complexity required that a better alternative should be provided to the masses that will also feature a unique interface for easy use. After years of development, several new variations of platforms came that have been designed for gaming purposes.

We have the ever-popular Windows 10, SteamOS, and, of course, Ubuntu. All three of these operating systems will require you to have proper gaming hardware if you wish to play popular gaming titles, but which one has been properly optimized and which is the best operating system for gaming? Let us find out:

Also Read: Best Linux Gaming Distros You Need To Try In 2017

SteamOS vs. Ubuntu vs. Windows 10: Gaming performance

For the past decade, gaming on Windows was the only viable option left for users because there was a lack of support for Linux, but that trend is slowly changing now. That is thanks to the increased support through Valve and SteamOS, which have resurrected the importance of Linux.

Even Ars Technica decided to perform their series of tests to show that Windows 10 was not the only OS you needed to comfortably game using other alternatives.

Windows 10 leads from the front, but Linux is being considered seriously now

The review comprised up of a Steam machine using the most recent version of SteamOS. Firing up the benchmarks to find out the best operating system for gaming, there was a hope that results would not be in favor of Windows 10 but that was not to be.

While you can engage in increased gaming sessions on a machine that is running SteamOS, it is safe to say that both SteamOS and Ubuntu are not able to keep up with Microsoft’s latest operating system despite the developmental leaps that have taken place in the past few years.

If you are going to be playing modern-day gaming titles and want the best performance possible while running decent-grade hardware, it is safe to say that Windows 10 is going to offer the best possible performance. However, that does not make Linux any useless. Keep in mind that these benchmarks were being run at a resolution of 2560 x 1600.

It is 2017 and we know for a fact that there are millions of gamers that still cling onto their 1080p monitor because either their hardware is not powerful enough to render high frame rates at higher resolutions, or it is possible that they want the highest possible performance while running expensive hardware since upgrading gaming monitors is not the highest priority for everyone.

Getting playable frame rates at resolutions higher than 1080p is very impressive given the fact that a couple of years back, no one would have bothered to look at Linux as a viable platform for gaming purposes.

A portion of why you see these performance gains is because it is possible that Valve is focusing on the Vulkan API. Vulkan reduces the overhead on the graphics processor and other resources to deliver increased performance in gaming titles, even on systems that are not running the best of hardware components.

Windows 10 remains the top-performer of the leaderboards for gaming performance but Linux is playing catch-up at a tremendous pace

If you want to game, Windows 10 currently remains the best choice over Linux and SteamOS. While there is no competition with Microsoft’s latest operating system, we should not ignore the fact that Linux has made some tremendous gains in a brief period.

With over a thousand titles available for Linux through Steam, you’re getting a massive number of options that you never knew existed a couple of years back. If you feel that unconditional love towards Linux, we will continue to encourage you to provide your undying support for the operating system, even though we are the bearer of bad news that you will currently experience performance drops when comparing it to Windows 10.

Steam will continue to support Linux as we’ve seen on previous occasions, but other hardware companies should also lend a helping hand. This will include the likes of Intel, AMD, NVIDIA and others which control the driver stack.

If it took decades for Linux to improve heavily, then we should not ruin your expectations a tad bit because it will take several more years to further reduce that performance gap between Windows 10 and the latter. However, the fact that Linux is getting there should mean that Microsoft has something to worry.

If you have something to add to this story on the best operating system for gaming, drop your thoughts and feedback.

Also Read: Best Linux Gaming Distros You Need To Try In 2017

Article source: https://fossbytes.com/best-operating-system-for-gaming-steamos-ubuntu-windows/

Ubuntu sends trash to its desktop’s desktop

Canonical is shifting around the trash can icon on the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 release, which might give some a sense of déjà vu.

Apple kicked off the trash in the corner trend in 1983, with an easily accessible icon for storing junk on its Lisa computer. In 1995, Microsoft added a “recycle bin” to the DOS replacement, Windows 95.

Moving on, in 2000 Apple unveiled Mac OS X and relocated its trash can to the infamous Dock.

Previously, Canonical had hidden away Ubuntu’s rubbish on the Unity launcher (obviously nothing like Apple’s Dock) or on GNOME shell panels, a spokesperson for Canonical told The Register.

Now, about 17 years later, Canonical’s Linux distro is finally following in Microsoft’s dusty footsteps and adding a trash can (rubbish bin) icon to its upcoming 17.10 release for October. Artful Aardvark is particularly notable because it (controversially) will be the first Ubuntu release that uses the GNOME shell by default instead of Unity.

On Tuesday, a Canonical developer blogged that the trash can’t go on the GNOME shell’s new Dock so it is getting placed on the desktop for default sessions.

Other distros – such as xubuntu – have a default desktop trash icon, but the Canonical spokesperson confirmed to The Register that this is indeed the first time it will happen in Ubuntu. ®

Sponsored:
The Joy and Pain of Buying IT – Have Your Say

Article source: https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/08/16/ubuntu_canonical_artful_aardvark_trash_desktop/

Ubuntu sends trash to its desktop’s desktop • The Register

Canonical is shifting around the trash can icon on the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 release, which might give some a sense of déjà vu.

Apple kicked off the trash in the corner trend in 1983, with an easily accessible icon for storing junk on its Lisa computer. In 1995, Microsoft added a “recycle bin” to the DOS replacement, Windows 95.

Moving on, in 2000 Apple unveiled Mac OS X and relocated its trash can to the infamous Dock.

Previously, Canonical had hidden away Ubuntu’s rubbish on the Unity launcher (obviously nothing like Apple’s Dock) or on GNOME shell panels, a spokesperson for Canonical told The Register.

Now, about 17 years later, Canonical’s Linux distro is finally following in Microsoft’s dusty footsteps and adding a trash can (rubbish bin) icon to its upcoming 17.10 release for October. Artful Aardvark is particularly notable because it (controversially) will be the first Ubuntu release that uses the GNOME shell by default instead of Unity.

On Tuesday, a Canonical developer blogged that the trash can’t go on the GNOME shell’s new Dock so it is getting placed on the desktop for default sessions.

Other distros – such as xubuntu – have a default desktop trash icon, but the Canonical spokesperson confirmed to The Register that this is indeed the first time it will happen in Ubuntu. ®

Sponsored:
The Joy and Pain of Buying IT – Have Your Say

Article source: https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/08/16/ubuntu_canonical_artful_aardvark_trash_desktop/

Cloud-optimized Linux: Inside Ubuntu’s edge in AWS cloud …

While the market’s cloud infrastructure solutions are beginning to consolidate, there remains a multitude of options for software development environments. Of the operating systems available, however, Ubuntu overwhelmingly leads as the operating system in Amazon.com Inc., according to Dustin Kirkland (pictured), head of product and strategy at Canonical Ltd., the company behind Ubuntu. In fact, about 70 percent of all instances running in Amazon right now are running open-source Ubuntu, Kirkland added.

One of the keys to Ubuntu’s success has been heavy optimization of the standard Linux kernel for cloud computing environments.

“We actually have an AWS-optimized Linux kernel. We’ve taken the Ubuntu Linux kernel and we’ve tuned it working with the Amazon kernel engineers to ensure that we carve out everything that’s not relevant inside of an Amazon data center,” Kirkland explained. “In doing so we’ve actually made the kernel 15 percent smaller, which reduces the security and storage footprint of that kernel. … We’ve done that by configuring parameters that enable virtualization drivers to work really well.” 

Kirkland spoke with Stu Miniman (@stu) and John Walls (@JohnWalls21), co-hosts of theCUBE, SiliconANGLE Media’s mobile livestreaming studio, during this week’s AWS Summit in New York City. (* Disclosure below.)

Cloud-optimized Linux

The Linux kernel optimization efforts that Canonical has made for the AWS stack also extend into hybrid cloud architectures with on-premises computing mixed in.

“The Amazon hypervisors are usually Xen-based, while typically what we find on premises is KVM [kernel-based virtual machine] or VMware-based. Most of what we goes into that virtual kernel that we built for Amazon actually applies to the virtual kernel that we built for VMware and KVM,” Kirkland said. “For the most part, it’s perfectly compatible all the way back to the virtual machines that you would run on-premises.” 

This optimization for both types of deployments provides a high degree of stickiness for developers looking to deploy applications both locally and in the cloud. 

“Hybrid is the ramp to being all in, but for quite a bit of the industry it’s the journey and destination as well. … Ubuntu helps provide an important portability layer. Knowing that something runs well on Ubuntu locally means that it’s going to run well on Ubuntu in Amazon, or visa versa,” Kirkland concluded.

Watch the complete video interview below, and be sure to check out more of SiliconANGLE’s and theCUBE’s coverage of AWS Summit. (* Disclosure: Canonical Ltd. sponsored this AWS Summit segment on SiliconANGLE Media’s theCUBE. Neither Canonical nor other sponsors have editorial control over content on theCUBE or SiliconANGLE.)

Photo: SiliconANGLE

Article source: https://siliconangle.com/blog/2017/08/15/cloud-optimized-linux-inside-ubuntus-edge-aws-cloud-computing-awssummi/

Ubuntu Budgie Distro: Simple, Clean and User-Friendly

Ubuntu Budgie is one of the few Linux distros to offer integration of a Budgie desktop-only edition, other than
Solus OS, whose developers created it.

Ubuntu Budgie is classy and user-friendly. It does not sacrifice performance for reliance on a simple design. It is maintained by a United Kingdom-based developer community. Previously called “Budgie-Remix,” it is an Ubuntu-based distribution featuring the Budgie desktop.

Although based on the Ubuntu Linux family, Ubuntu Budgie is not from Canonical, Ubuntu’s parent company. The Solus community originally developed Budgie from scratch and tightly integrated the desktop user interface with the GNOME stack.

Designed with the modern user in mind, Budgie is known for its simplicity and elegance. It has a plain and clean style and is easy to use.

The Budgie desktop is not a fork of any other desktop project. Its designers planned for an easy integration into other distros, and it is an open source project in its own right.

The integration of an improved Budgie desktop environment with a solid Ubuntu core makes Ubuntu Budgie an interesting and stable Linux distro.

Distro Overview

Budgie has an uncluttered design with little software bloat. It is one of the more promising new desktop variations. Some distros offer Budgie as an option. A few distro developers offer Budgie as the only desktop option.



The Ubuntu Budgie community first released version 17.04 Zesty this spring. The developers follow a rolling upgrade system that constantly upgrades previous 17.04 releases with smaller point releases.

Users of an existing Zesty version automatically receive the newest releases when they run software updates. This is a review of the point release posted earlier this month.

This release places a predefined set of applications on the Plank by default. In Budgie, Plank is a dock-like utility that gives you quick-launch capability for a set of core applications. Previously, Plank apps were determined randomly at installation.

This release also adds numerous style and theme improvements, along with application updates.

Ravin’ Over Raven

At the heart of the Budgie desktop is Raven — an applet, notification and customization center. Combined with the system settings panel, it is the key to controlling the user experience through easy customizations.

To access Raven, use the super key + N key combination. You also can click on the Raven icon on the panel bar. It slides out from the right screen edge much like the GNOME 3 virtual desktop display.

Within the Raven applet, click the Applets tab to access the controls for calendar, speaker and microphone. Click the Notifications tab to see unread system notifications.

Click the Setting gear wheel to open the Budgie settings panel. There you find two tabs: General and Panel.



Using Raven

The General tab display lets you change widget, icon and cursor themes. You can show desktop icons with a single click and tweak a variety of system fonts.

In the Panel tab display settings section, you can choose placement of the panel as well as add more panels and their inner applets. You also gain granular control over individual applet settings.

At the bottom of the Raven panel are buttons to open the system settings control panel, activate power settings and power off.



Simplified Menus

Right-clicking on the desktop opens a limited menu with the ability to create a new folder, change background, open terminal window and organize icons.

The application menu has no cascading views. It is a two-column design.

The left column lists the application categories. The right column lists the individual apps in that category. A search window at the top of the two columns makes it easy to quickly locate any installed program.

Workspace Limitations

One of the essential make-or-break functions of any Linux desktop is the UI’s handling of virtual workspaces. Depending on the distro and the desktop flavor involved, workspace switching can be inconvenient or very limited. Budgie’s approach to this task is somewhere in the middle of the usability scale.

Budgie has come a long way in usability growth since its early days in Solus OS. Ubuntu Budgie integrates the latest Budgie version. It is upgraded to v10.2.9 from v10.2.7. However, the functionality still falls short of what I have come to expect in the Cinnamon and MATE desktops, among others with more advanced workspace switcher functionality.

Using the procedure detailed above, I added the workplace switcher applet to the panel bar. That let me access four workspaces.

Budgie does not let me add or reduce that number, though, and it lacks the ability to map virtual navigation to set keyboard shortcuts, or a right-click option to send an open window to another virtual workspace.

Software Sufficiency

With a goal of high usability out of the box, Ubuntu Budgie provides some of the best software in each category. That goal is stretched due to its honoring the mission to reduce software bloat. You get one application rather than a choice of numerous titles. Of course, you can add and remove applications to suit your taste.

The LibreOffice suite is preinstalled. You get the Chromium Web browser with Geary mail. The graphics collection is limited to an in-house photos app and Simple Scan. The Sound and Videos apps are GNOME MPV and Rythmbox Music Player. The Cheese Webcam Booth is included as well.

System tools may not satisfy Linux veterans, as the selections are really bare bones. There is a similar scarcity in the Administration and Preferences categories too. Even the Utilities are critically limited.

I am all in favor of eliminating software bloat, but that mandate goes a bit too far for my liking. It is a balancing act between having to spend time removing excessive or unused applications, or adding just what you need to build the software library your way.

Bottom Line

The Budgie desktop lacks the glitz and glitter found in more seasoned desktop environments. Animation is nonexistent.

That said, Budgie is an ideal desktop environment that is very user-friendly. Its customization options and ease-of-use make it a great trade-off.

Still, its design seems a bit too simplified for seasoned Linux users.

Canonical’s Ubuntu Linux distro also offers users a Budgie desktop release. Do not confuse that Ubuntu flavor with the Ubuntu Budgie distro. The two desktop integrations have different appearances and feature sets.

Want to Suggest a Review?

Is there a Linux software application or distro you’d like to suggest for review? Something you love or would like to get to know?

Please
email your ideas to me, and I’ll consider them for a future Linux Picks and Pans column.

And use the Reader Comments feature below to provide your input!


Jack M. Germain has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2003. His main areas of focus are enterprise IT, Linux and open source technologies. He has written numerous reviews of Linux distros and other open source software.
Email Jack.

Article source: http://www.linuxinsider.com/story/84735.html?rss=1

Ubuntu Budgie Distro: Simple, Clean and User-Friendly – LinuxInsider

Ubuntu Budgie is one of the few Linux distros to offer integration of a Budgie desktop-only edition, other than
Solus OS, whose developers created it.

Ubuntu Budgie is classy and user-friendly. It does not sacrifice performance for reliance on a simple design. It is maintained by a United Kingdom-based developer community. Previously called “Budgie-Remix,” it is an Ubuntu-based distribution featuring the Budgie desktop.

Although based on the Ubuntu Linux family, Ubuntu Budgie is not from Canonical, Ubuntu’s parent company. The Solus community originally developed Budgie from scratch and tightly integrated the desktop user interface with the GNOME stack.

Designed with the modern user in mind, Budgie is known for its simplicity and elegance. It has a plain and clean style and is easy to use.

The Budgie desktop is not a fork of any other desktop project. Its designers planned for an easy integration into other distros, and it is an open source project in its own right.

The integration of an improved Budgie desktop environment with a solid Ubuntu core makes Ubuntu Budgie an interesting and stable Linux distro.

Distro Overview

Budgie has an uncluttered design with little software bloat. It is one of the more promising new desktop variations. Some distros offer Budgie as an option. A few distro developers offer Budgie as the only desktop option.



The Ubuntu Budgie community first released version 17.04 Zesty this spring. The developers follow a rolling upgrade system that constantly upgrades previous 17.04 releases with smaller point releases.

Users of an existing Zesty version automatically receive the newest releases when they run software updates. This is a review of the point release posted earlier this month.

This release places a predefined set of applications on the Plank by default. In Budgie, Plank is a dock-like utility that gives you quick-launch capability for a set of core applications. Previously, Plank apps were determined randomly at installation.

This release also adds numerous style and theme improvements, along with application updates.

Ravin’ Over Raven

At the heart of the Budgie desktop is Raven — an applet, notification and customization center. Combined with the system settings panel, it is the key to controlling the user experience through easy customizations.

To access Raven, use the super key + N key combination. You also can click on the Raven icon on the panel bar. It slides out from the right screen edge much like the GNOME 3 virtual desktop display.

Within the Raven applet, click the Applets tab to access the controls for calendar, speaker and microphone. Click the Notifications tab to see unread system notifications.

Click the Setting gear wheel to open the Budgie settings panel. There you find two tabs: General and Panel.



Using Raven

The General tab display lets you change widget, icon and cursor themes. You can show desktop icons with a single click and tweak a variety of system fonts.

In the Panel tab display settings section, you can choose placement of the panel as well as add more panels and their inner applets. You also gain granular control over individual applet settings.

At the bottom of the Raven panel are buttons to open the system settings control panel, activate power settings and power off.



Simplified Menus

Right-clicking on the desktop opens a limited menu with the ability to create a new folder, change background, open terminal window and organize icons.

The application menu has no cascading views. It is a two-column design.

The left column lists the application categories. The right column lists the individual apps in that category. A search window at the top of the two columns makes it easy to quickly locate any installed program.

Workspace Limitations

One of the essential make-or-break functions of any Linux desktop is the UI’s handling of virtual workspaces. Depending on the distro and the desktop flavor involved, workspace switching can be inconvenient or very limited. Budgie’s approach to this task is somewhere in the middle of the usability scale.

Budgie has come a long way in usability growth since its early days in Solus OS. Ubuntu Budgie integrates the latest Budgie version. It is upgraded to v10.2.9 from v10.2.7. However, the functionality still falls short of what I have come to expect in the Cinnamon and MATE desktops, among others with more advanced workspace switcher functionality.

Using the procedure detailed above, I added the workplace switcher applet to the panel bar. That let me access four workspaces.

Budgie does not let me add or reduce that number, though, and it lacks the ability to map virtual navigation to set keyboard shortcuts, or a right-click option to send an open window to another virtual workspace.

Software Sufficiency

With a goal of high usability out of the box, Ubuntu Budgie provides some of the best software in each category. That goal is stretched due to its honoring the mission to reduce software bloat. You get one application rather than a choice of numerous titles. Of course, you can add and remove applications to suit your taste.

The LibreOffice suite is preinstalled. You get the Chromium Web browser with Geary mail. The graphics collection is limited to an in-house photos app and Simple Scan. The Sound and Videos apps are GNOME MPV and Rythmbox Music Player. The Cheese Webcam Booth is included as well.

System tools may not satisfy Linux veterans, as the selections are really bare bones. There is a similar scarcity in the Administration and Preferences categories too. Even the Utilities are critically limited.

I am all in favor of eliminating software bloat, but that mandate goes a bit too far for my liking. It is a balancing act between having to spend time removing excessive or unused applications, or adding just what you need to build the software library your way.

Bottom Line

The Budgie desktop lacks the glitz and glitter found in more seasoned desktop environments. Animation is nonexistent.

That said, Budgie is an ideal desktop environment that is very user-friendly. Its customization options and ease-of-use make it a great trade-off.

Still, its design seems a bit too simplified for seasoned Linux users.

Canonical’s Ubuntu Linux distro also offers users a Budgie desktop release. Do not confuse that Ubuntu flavor with the Ubuntu Budgie distro. The two desktop integrations have different appearances and feature sets.

Want to Suggest a Review?

Is there a Linux software application or distro you’d like to suggest for review? Something you love or would like to get to know?

Please
email your ideas to me, and I’ll consider them for a future Linux Picks and Pans column.

And use the Reader Comments feature below to provide your input!


Jack M. Germain has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2003. His main areas of focus are enterprise IT, Linux and open source technologies. He has written numerous reviews of Linux distros and other open source software.
Email Jack.

Article source: http://www.linuxinsider.com/story/84735.html?rss=1

Cloud-optimized Linux: Inside Ubuntu’s edge in AWS cloud computing

While the market’s cloud infrastructure solutions are beginning to consolidate, there remains a multitude of options for software development environments. Of the operating systems available, however, Ubuntu overwhelmingly leads as the operating system in Amazon, according to Dustin Kirkland (pictured), head of product and strategy at Canonical Ltd., the company behind Ubuntu. In fact, about 70 percent of all instances running in Amazon right now are running open-source Ubuntu, Kirkland added.

One of the keys to Ubuntu’s success has been heavy optimization of the standard Linux kernel for cloud computing environments.

“We actually have an AWS-optimized Linux kernel. We’ve taken the Ubuntu Linux kernel and we’ve tuned it working with the Amazon kernel engineers to ensure that we carve out everything that’s not relevant inside of an Amazon data center,” Kirkland explained. “In doing so we’ve actually made the kernel 15 percent smaller, which reduces the security and storage footprint of that kernel. … We’ve done that by configuring parameters that enable virtualization drivers to work really well.” 

Kirkland spoke with Stu Miniman (@stu) and John Walls (@JohnWalls21), co-hosts of theCUBE, SiliconANGLE Media’s mobile livestreaming studio, during this week’s AWS Summit in New York City. (* Disclosure below.)

Cloud-optimized Linux

The Linux kernel optimization efforts that Canonical has made for the AWS stack also extend into hybrid cloud architectures with on-premises computing mixed in.

“The Amazon hypervisors are usually Xen-based, while typically what we find on premises is KVM [kernel-based virtual machine] or VMware-based. Most of what we goes into that virtual kernel that we built for Amazon actually applies to the virtual kernel that we built for VMware and KVM,” Kirkland said. “For the most part, it’s perfectly compatible all the way back to the virtual machines that you would run on-premises.” 

This optimization for both types of deployments provides a high degree of stickiness for developers looking to deploy applications both locally and in the cloud. 

“Hybrid is the ramp to being all in, but for quite a bit of the industry it’s the journey and destination as well. … Ubuntu helps provide an important portability layer. Knowing that something runs well on Ubuntu locally means that it’s going to run well on Ubuntu in Amazon, or visa versa,” Kirkland concluded.

Watch the complete video interview below, and be sure to check out more of SiliconANGLE’s and theCUBE’s coverage of AWS Summit. (* Disclosure: Canonical Ltd. sponsored this AWS Summit segment on SiliconANGLE Media’s theCUBE. Neither Canonical nor other sponsors have editorial control over content on theCUBE or SiliconANGLE.)

Photo: SiliconANGLE

Article source: https://siliconangle.com/blog/2017/08/15/cloud-optimized-linux-inside-ubuntus-edge-aws-cloud-computing-awssummi/

THE COST OF UBUNTU ON ORGANISATIONS

Africa, like the rest of other continents, has its own unique culture that distinguishes it from the rest of the globe.

Africa, like the rest of other continents, has its own unique culture that distinguishes it from the rest of the globe. 

Though we have to a greater extent adopted the Western way of doing things; from business to social activities, but the truth remains that we have our own unique identity that differentiates us from the rest of the world.

Social culture at work is aimed at reflecting on our social ability and how it affects organisational performance in terms of productivity. We practice and implement business from the Western culture where the status quo is every man for himself, yet here in Africa we still have the old tradition and values of ‘Ubuntu’. The principle of Ubuntu is what has distinguished us from the rest of humanity. The West is totally driven by capitalism where a leader or an employee has to perform and deliver as expected when employed by an institution, if not, that person is shown the exit door. The Western culture of doing business has no room for the weaklings, only the fittest survive to climb and soar in business, politics or whatever sphere of influence it may be. 

 

The Western versus the African perspective 

 

The Western culture is driven by productivity and the focus is on competing and succeeding at global level yet in our region and continent or maybe bring it closer to home, we still hold to Ubuntu values and practices.  Defining Ubuntu one would say “humanity to others”.  That means when an organisation hires an employee, it understands that, the employee has a family which depends on him/her.  

Even though understanding and agreement between the employer and employee is that the employee is leasing his/her skills, talent and abilities to the company, if he falls short or below the line of performance still the organisation carries that person under the spirit of Ubuntu. If the leader of that institution sends that person packing because of poor performance, the rest of the  employees tend to behave like a tortoise, they get into a shell and then that leader is feared and at times called names. 

Business excellence asserts that the firm stance of a leader sets the tone in the business. All employees come to know and clearly understand that business is business, people have to perform. The standard of performance of that institution is raised to at least above average if not to optimal levels.  But the big question still remains as to how many of our leaders have the heart to bring the full Western practice in their institutions or rather how do they find a balance applying the Western practice as well as the African perspective of doing business.

 

The cost of Ubuntu

The burden of social culture on businesses especially those that compete globally is such that one can only wonder as to how to optimally balance institutions expected to raise the bar to operate and compete at global level. This is an element that organisations have to ponder on because it is a reality that they often have to deal with, one way or the other. The million dollar question is what is the cost of social culture to African businesses or African institutions? Can Africa preserve its Ubuntu culture while embracing the Western culture of every man for himself and still continues to compete globally?  

As I pondered on the questions and answers of the cost of social culture on African businesses, I thought maybe we can learn from multinational companies as to how do they do it?  How do they compete at global level yet have offices operating in different continents with different cultures?

Noting the culture of multinationals, these institutions run their organisations through systems that manage performance of employees. So when an employee fails to deliver then it is the system that sends off that employee packing, but still the human  resources department and leadership of that organisations still have to deal with  the burden of social culture, in that someone has to terminate the services of that non-performing employee and send him/her home. As I was writing this article, I was thinking, how do we as Africans find a balance? How do we get the best of both worlds? How do we preserve that which has made and distinguished  us as a continent (Ubuntu) yet at the same time have institutions that are run like global machines- with the ability to compete effectively with their global counter parts. I guess it’s high time Africans have an indaba on how do we become part of globe while preserving the pride of our rich African culture. But by the look of things (at least to me) it seem this globalisation  monster is here to stay and one way or the other our culture will be eroded, diluted by an inherent global culture of the supreme economies of the West. The question is, can Ubuntu survive in this twenty first century?

Article source: http://www.observer.org.sz/features/89355-the-cost-of-ubuntu-on-organisations.html

Windows vs Ubuntu: A Look Before You Switch

When I first thought about writing an article on Windows vs. Ubuntu, I decided pretty quickly that I would avoid trying to get people to switch operating systems. The fact is, that’s a deeply personal decision that I simply don’t need to influence.

Instead, this article is written for someone who is considering switching from Windows to Ubuntu, doesn’t mind exploring the unknown corners of an operating system they’re unfamiliar with and won’t give up at the first sign of trouble. This may sound harsh, but this simply isn’t an article targeting those who are simply “window shopping” – no pun intended.

It’s been my experience that those who stick with Linux are those individuals who fall into one of two camps. Those who have a desire to learn and adapt. And those who simply have someone more tech-savvy manage their computers for them. This article will cater to the former.

Dual-Booting Windows vs Ubuntu

I’ll be first to admit that I’m not a fan of dual-booting Windows with Ubuntu. My reasoning isn’t ideological. My issue with it comes down to how Windows tends to break dual-booting after its updates. Technically one would be fair in pointing out that the larger issue is EFI, but the end result is Windows being the only bootable operating system.

Assuming you accept this can and absolutely will happen to you eventually, then the next step is to decide how you want to map out your dual-booting system. It’s certainly possible to simply setup the needed partitions and set up a Windows and Ubuntu installation scheme. But there is an order to things to consider. For example, which operating system should you install first?

Most experts agree that you’ll want to install Windows first, run its updates and configure it to your liking. After this is done, you would install Ubuntu while making sure you choose the “Install along side of Windows” option in Ubuntu’s installation options. This “should” get GRUB appearing upon the installation completion so you can select the OS you wish to boot into going forward.

If at all possible, I prefer to use separate hard drives for each OS. While it’s not critical, it’s merely a preference in how I like to handle my partitioning or dealing with drive failure. I also recommend setting up a dedicated home partition for your Ubuntu installation. This makes reinstalling Ubuntu much easier and provides a “lazy person’s backup” if you are running a few days behind on your proper offsite backups for your user data. This is not suggesting that running a dedicated home partition is a reliable means of backing up your user data. Instead, this approach simply saves you time if the drive is intact and the data is uncorrupted after hosing an Ubuntu installation. Moving on.

Running Software on Windows vs Ubuntu

Before you install Ubuntu for the first time, I highly recommend getting used to using software that’s available for both operating systems before committing to running Ubuntu full time. Some Linux users love to suggest that software is software and switching platforms just isn’t that big a deal. I disagree and believe that it’s critical to know what applications you’ll be using on the new platform and how they work.

For example, if I’m a Photoshop user and believe that switching to GIMP is going to be a straight forward process, I’m in for a bit of a shock. GIMP is fantastic image manipulation software, however it’s layout and features do differ from it’s Adobe influenced cousin. For example, Photoshop handles CMYK color mode easily out of the box with the right ICC profile setup ahead of time. GIMP can provide elements of this, with additional plugins installed. Perhaps more importantly, GIMP lacks full support for CMYK.

An alternative for Linux users looking into proper CMYK support would be going forward with Krita. As someone coming into Linux from Windows, the consideration here is that Krita is a paint program where Photoshop is a photo editing program. Thankfully, Krita has outstanding documentation that can help you decide if Krita is a match for you.

And this my friends, is why I recommend trying out Linux software on a platform you’re familiar with first. Most open source software for the desktop is readily available for multiple platforms afterall. If you find the Linux alternative easy to use, then all the better. But if you find that there are some titles that simply aren’t replaceable in Linux, you can dual-boot with Windows and still have a robust Linux experience.

Windows vs Ubuntu Hardware

Various Linux user forums are filled with people complaining that some element of their Linux installation isn’t working as expected. The twist is that most of these posts are made by people running Linux on notebooks built for Windows. Obviously this doesn’t mean that you can’t run Linux on these machines. Quite the contrary, actually. What it does mean is that when a machine has the made for Windows sticker on it, you’re accepting that its up to you to make sure you have a compatible Linux distro.

As a rule, I recommend laptops that come with Intel graphics. Unless you’ve purchased a machine that was built for Ubuntu or some other distro, running a mixed graphics environment is generally best left to advanced users. The exception to this is if you purchase a “built for Ubuntu” notebook that comes with mixed graphics. This means engineers have already tested and confirmed that computer will run correctly with Ubuntu and possibly other distros.

Another hardware consideration is your networking hardware. Any ethernet card is going to work just fine. And while most any wireless card should work with Ubuntu and other Linux distros, I highly recommend Atheros or Intel cards whenever possible. Both wireless brands will support the latest wireless standards in Linux. I strongly recommend against Broadcom chipsets. Despite the fact that they are supposed to work fine in Linux, I have seen many examples where even in 2017 people still struggle with this brand.

And then there is the matter of audio. Honestly, I don’t think there’s much to say here. While I think Linux audio still over-complicates with its audio architectures and sound servers, overall it does work well. For newcomers, the one application for handling multiple sound cards on Ubuntu that I recommend is called pavucontrol. This software provides you functionality not found in all distros. In addition to Output and Input tabs, pavucontrol also provides playback and recording tabs. These allow you to send different audio streams to different soundcards/headsets.

So what does a user do when something doesn’t work at all? My first suggestion is to visit my Linux troubleshooting article. Odds are there is a fix there that will get things working for you. If that doesn’t work, then perhaps the problems is that you’ve overlooked something. I once spent ten minutes trying to figure out why my mouse stopped working. Turns out I had kicked the cord lose and simply wasn’t aware of it! Stuff like that happens, not just with Ubuntu, but with any operating system.

Getting Help with Windows vs Ubuntu

When you have a problem with Windows, you’re able to get help both online as well as locally from a local PC repair shop. When you use a Linux distro like Ubuntu, you’re almost always going to be seeking out help online. Local help for “non-enterprise Linux” simply isn’t a sustainable business unfortunately.

For Ubuntu, I recommend sticking to Ubuntu Answers for help. Not only does it provide a solid place to search for a solution, but you’ll also find that asking your question there yields a great chance for success. Remember to be specific. Share the affected device brand and model, what you tried thus far, stuff like that goes a long way to getting you the answer to your troubleshooting query.

Windows vs Ubuntu: Which is Right for You?

You may remember at the beginning of this article that I couldn’t accurately suggest that one option was better than the other. This holds true, but with one exception. After spending some time between the two operating systems you should be in a place where you can finally come to a decision which is the right platform that best meets your needs. For me, Ubuntu MATE LTS remains my preferred operating system. My reasons are many, but it mostly comes down to the fact that if I have an issue, I can fix it myself. No need to wait for anyone else in most cases.

What say you? Do you run Ubuntu or another distro full time? Have you felt the need to dual-boot or otherwise have access to Windows to run certain applications? I’d love to hear about it. Not from a this is why your choice is better, rather why it’s better for your as an individual.

Article source: http://www.datamation.com/open-source/windows-vs-ubuntu-a-look-before-you-switch.html

New Ubuntu 17.10 dock revealed

Canonical, Ubuntu’s parent company, made a decision recently to move away from the Unity desktop environment project and come back into the fold by switching to GNOME. Now a new development branch of the upcoming release shows how the new left-hand panel could look.

Canonical has based its dock on the Dash to Dock GNOME Shell addon but has been making some alterations to make it better suit its requirements. Firstly, the settings UI has been removed in the fork. The settings allowed users to adjust the location, size, behaviour, and look of the dock. In order to edit the dock in Ubuntu, users will be forced to make changes through the dconf-editor app.

Image via OMG Ubuntu

A few of the dock settings will also be available through the Control Centre too including the ability to enable intellihide which makes the dock hide when it’s in the way of a window.

Including a dock that replicates the basic function of Unity is a sensible move by Canonical. Ubuntu tends to be the first port of call for Linux newbies so keeping some sort of familiarity with the user interface will means less people getting scared off by new changes.

Source: OMG Ubuntu

Article source: https://www.neowin.net/news/new-ubuntu-1710-dock-revealed

How to find the right Linux distribution for you

Which Linux distribution is right for you? It’s a question anyone in IT knows might come across their desk at some point. I’m going to make the answering of this question a bit easier. To reach a conclusion, you have to first ask yourself if you need commercial technical support. If the answer is “yes,” then you turn to Red Hat, SUSE, or Ubuntu. Know this: With both Red Hat and Ubuntu, support is an add on cost. SUSE, on the other hand, includes a certain level of support when you purchase their enterprise product.

If commercial support isn’t of concern to you, your options are wide open. That also means the choice becomes a bit more challenging. Let’s make it a bit easier. Are you looking for a server platform with a user-friendly package manager? If so, look to Ubuntu, CentOS, Fedora, or openSUSE — any distribution that works with a either apt, dnf, or zypper. If you’re looking for a server distribution that offers next to no learning curve, you can pretty much narrow that down to Ubuntu. What about the desktop? That’s where the choice gets really challenging. The best way to choose is to find one that works with apt and then select the desktop that most appeals to you. If you want modern, look to any distro with GNOME or take a look at Elementary OS. If a more standard interface is up your alley, look no further than Linux Mint or Kubuntu.

This hardly scratches the surface, but illustrates how you can make choosing the right Linux for you a bit easier.

Also see

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Article source: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/how-to-find-the-right-linux-distribution-for-you/

Ubuntu Linux now on Windows Store (for Insiders)

Microsoft finally confirmed that Hell has indeed frozen over – Ubuntu is at long last available from the Windows Store.

Canonical’s Linux distro is now available for installation on Windows Store on Insider build 16215 and higher. Windows 10 already supports Ubuntu via the Windows Subsystem for Linux, rolled out in the Creators Update earlier this year.

Microsoft says the advantages of installing the Windows Store version of Ubuntu are more reliable and faster downloads as well as support for installing and running different distros side by side. For example, if you already have a legacy Ubuntu distro installed, your Windows Store downloaded version will run “alongside but isolated” from it.

You’ll also be able to launch ‘Store-delivered distros via the command-line.

The downloading is nippier because of the Windows Store’s block-based downloading scheme, Redmond claims.

Microsoft originally announced it was bringing Ubuntu to the Windows Store back in May.

As previously reported, it’s also working on bringing over the SUSE and Fedora Linux distros, which should arrive in the next couple of weeks. ®

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Article source: https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/07/11/linux_is_on_the_windows_store_download_now/

Canonical needs your help transitioning Ubuntu Linux from Unity to GNOME

help-wanted

Now is a very exciting time to be an Ubuntu user. The upcoming 17.10 version of the Linux-based operating system — codenamed “Artful Aardvark” — is coming in October with a new desktop environment — GNOME. That’s right, Canonical has decided to kill the Unity environment, making the new version something very exciting. While some people will mourn Unity, it is the right move.

Being that we are already in August, the clock is starting to tick for Canonical, meaning it really needs to get everything running properly if it wants a smooth user experience with 17.10 in October. On August 24 and 25, the Ubuntu Desktop team will be holding a “Fit and Finish Sprint,” where they will aggressively test GNOME. Canonical is also asking the Ubuntu community to help with this process. In other words, you might be able to assist with making Artful Aardvark even better. What makes this particularly cool, however, is that Canonical will be selecting some community members to visit its London office on August 24 between 4pm and 9pm.

ALSO READ: Ubuntu joins the Windows Store Linux party

“Over the two days we’ll be scrutinizing the new GNOME Shell desktop experience, looking for anything jarring/glitchy or out of place. We’ll be working on the GTK, GDM and desktop theme alike, to fix inconsistencies, performance, behavioral or visual issues. We’ll also be looking at the default key bindings, panel color schemes and anything else we discover along the way,” says Alan Pope, Community Manager, Canonical.

Pope also says, “We’re inviting a small number of community contributors to join us in the London office on Thursday evening to help out with this effort. Ideally we’re looking for people who are experienced in identifying (and fixing) theme issues, CSS experts and GNOME Shell / GTK themers.”

ALSO READ: System76 Galago Pro is the MacBook Pro alternative the Linux community has been waiting for [Review]

To be considered for visiting the London office, simply complete this form. Please note, Canonical is not paying for travel, so unless you will be in London on August 24, don’t waste anyone’s time by submitting. If you don’t get picked because it fills up, do not panic. You can also contribute remotely using the #ubuntu-desktop IRC channel on Freenode.

Photo credit: karen roach / Shutterstock

Article source: https://betanews.com/2017/08/08/canonical-ubuntu-linux-gnome/

Lebohang Motumi Pens Ubuntu Cape Town FC Deal | www …

Former Polokwane City midfielder has joined Ubuntu Cape Town FC, after parting ways with the Limpopo outfit.

Read: Another Club Sale Confirmed

The deal has been confirmed by the NFD outfit that recently bought the second-tier status of FC Cape Town.

“Ubuntu Cape Town Football Club is delighted to announce the signing of defensive midfielder, Lebohang Motumi.

“Motumi, having spent three seasons in the PSL at Polokwane City, is no stranger to professional football and plans to settle him in with the new Cape Town based NFD side have been in the works for just over 10 days,” the Mother City outfit confirmed on their website.

The Welkom-born player has been officially welcomed to the Cape side by the club’s chairman, Michael Jenkins.

“Lebo has adjusted well to life in Cape Town during his short stay with us and has shown incredible signs of an experienced and professional player.

“The fact that we can attract a player with three years of PSL experience is fantastic motivation for our young group of players and management.

“Lebs will be a major asset to the club in the upcoming campaign as he brings tremendous experience.

“He’ll play a pivotal role in front of our back four with his blend of being a fierce and aggressive tackler as well as being an excellent passer of the ball. This makes him perfect for a team like ours who is comfortable to play out from the back,” Jenkins told the club’s website.

Motumi has joined the club on a two-year deal.

“From what I have seen, we have a good team. There’s a lot of young stars who are full of potential and the coach is playing a big role in terms of how he wants us to play,” Motumi has been quoted as saying.

Read: Siwahla Excited For Starting Afresh Overseas  

Motumi is the fourth marquee signing for Ubuntu, as the club has also added Ethen Sampson, Bukhosi Sibanda and Taahir Ganga to Roger Links’ squad. 

Find all updates on the latest rumours and confirmed deals in our Transfer Centre!

Article source: http://www.soccerladuma.co.za/news/articles/local/categories/south-africa/lebohang-motumi-pens-ubuntu-cape-town-fc-deal/275293

Canonical releases Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS with new kernel

Canonical has released the latest point release (or service pack in Microsoft language) for Ubuntu. Ubuntu 16.04.3 rolls all the updates the operating system has received into the ISO to save users having to re-install all the available updates. In addition, 16.04.3 ships with a new Hardware Enablement (HWE) stack which includes an updated kernel.

The HWE stack in this release includes the Linux 4.10 kernel and the Mesa 17.0 graphics stack; both of which are available in the 17.04 Ubuntu release. HWE kernels are only supported until the next HWE stack is made available, therefore it is important to keep your system updated in order to continue to get security updates for kernels.

For users already running Ubuntu 16.04, updating to the new point release is simple, just install the updates offered by the Update Manager. Those of you who install 16.04.2 will automatically receive the HWE stack, however, if you install 16.04 or 16.04.1 then you’ll not receive the new HWE stack because they shipped with the original GA kernel which is supported for the entire lifecycle of the release.

If you fall into the latter category but want the new HWE stack, then you can install it with a single command (server users should omit the xorg package): sudo apt install –install-recommends linux-generic-hwe-16.04 xserver-xorg-hwe-16.04

The new ISOs are available for download right now over at Ubuntu.com and are supported until 2021.

Source: Softpedia

Article source: https://www.neowin.net/news/canonical-releases-ubuntu-16043-lts-with-new-kernel